The United States has a new president, but the fight continues

(Image: Indigenous Environmental Network - Twitter)

Press Pool

Indigenous Environmental Network: We must see systemic change in the relationship between Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians and this federal government

News Release

Indigenous Environmental Network

Relatives,

We, the Indigenous Environmental Network, are celebrating the defeat of Donald Trump as a reminder of our collective power to confront white supremacy and fascism. A national effort of grassroots organizing by Black, Indigenous Peoples, LGBTQIA and People of Color provided the essential votes needed to sway this election. We cannot say this enough: This is our victory, we did this for our communities. We will not mince words. The United States is a settler-state that has always exploited the land, its people and resources. Even with the change of executive power, we know that the systems that commodify our people, lands, water and sky will not be the ones to save them. 

As such, we celebrate this moment as a bellwether of BIPOC leadership and strategy, and keep our eyes focused on the prize of radically imagining a better future for us all. A future that depends on a new economic and environmental paradigm.

The United States has a new president. Our network will continue to be a driving force in holding the powers in office accountable to the original peoples of these lands and territories. All across Turtle Island Indigenous peoples are rising up to assert our inherent sovereign rights, defend our territories, and protect the future generations. For the health and respect of the sacredness of Mother Earth and Father Sky, we will not falter, Indigenous voices will be heard.

We demand climate justice, we demand a just transition, we demand an economic just recovery driven by environmental justice and ethics, we demand our sovereign rights be respected and strengthened. The new presidential administration must embrace the rejection of an extractive economy and build a relationship to the sacredness of Mother Earth and all her relations.

We must see systemic change in the relationship between Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians and this federal government. We must see the full recognition and enforcement of our treaty rights, the return of our lands, and the full implementation of Free, Prior and Informed Consent. 

We envision a new paradigm that recognizes the territorial integrity and rights of Mother Earth and the self-determination of the first peoples of this land. And we stand with Black, people of color, the poor, migrants, LGBTQIA and other marginalized people who are demanding the very same systemic change.

We only have One Mother Earth and One Father Sky. For the sake of the next seven generations of life on this planet we will continue to build power towards a better tomorrow.

See you on the frontlines, 

The Staff of Indigenous Environmental Network

About Indigenous Environmental Network

Established in 1990, the Indigenous Environmental Network is an international environmental justice nonprofit that works with tribal grassroots organizations to build the capacity of Indigenous communities. Indigenous Environmental Network’s activities include empowering Indigenous communities and tribal governments to develop mechanisms to protect our sacred sites, land, water, air, natural resources, the health of both our people and all living things, and to build economically sustainable communities.

Learn more here: ienearth.org

Indigenous Environmental Network banner, IEN
(Image: Indigenous Environmental Network banner)
Comments

Press Pool

FEATURED
COMMUNITY