News Release

National Council of Urban American Health

After months of tireless advocacy, the National Council of Urban Indian Health (NCUIH) has partnered with Native American Lifelines (NAL), the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and the Indian Health Service (IHS) to bring the COVID-19 vaccine to urban Indians in the Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia metropolitan area.

Join us today, April 28, to hear from National Council of Urban Indian Health, the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and Native American LifeLines - Baltimore on working collaboratively to bring the COVID-19 vaccine to DMV Natives.

In addition to discussion, this webinar will also feature a Q&A for participants that may have questions for our panelists.

We hope you join us in celebrating this important turning point in protecting urban Indians in the DMV!

Register here.

"The Power of Partnership - Vaccine Access for DMV Natives" webinar flyer.

"The Power of Partnership - Vaccine Access for DMV Natives" webinar flyer.

Vaccine Distribution to Urban Indians

Since last fall, the National Council of Urban Indian Health and Native American Lifelines have pushed for inclusion of the 65,000 Natives in the Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia Metropolitan Area. As Natives are dying from COVID-19 at the highest rates worldwide, the National Council of Urban Indian Health has advocated to the federal government to prioritize this population for vaccines.

Urban Indian Organizations (UIOs) across the country have highly successful vaccine rollouts that have been touted in the national and local media. After a recent study in January from the Urban Indian Health Institute showed that nearly 75% of Natives would get vaccinated, Urban Indian Organizations are seeing record patients and regularly hosting mass vaccination clinics with hundreds of participants. Because of the success of vaccine administration by Urban Indian Organizations, local and other non-profit organizations have partnered with Urban Indian Organizations. While there is much talk of vaccine equity on a national scale, no state nor the District of Columbia, has prioritized Natives or any other race for vaccines, so Urban Indian Organizations have filled a vital role. For example, one Urban Indian Organizations in Montana vaccinated 180 teachers who work with Native students, while many others are sharing their vaccines with the NAACP and LatinX organizations to reach other highly vulnerable groups.

The National Council of Urban Indian Health created an online petition to urge HHS to provide vaccines to DMV Natives and sent a letter to Administration officials to request vaccines. The Indian Health Service has also assisted the past several months, trying to coordinate vaccines for urban Indians in the area. Several Urban Indian Organizations (UIOs) in other states even offered to fly their staff to the DMV to administer vaccines. Finally, urban Indians in the area will have access to vaccines through Native American Lifelines due to the hard work of Native American Lifelines’ staff and the advocacy of the National Council of Urban Indian Health.

Read more here.

National Council of Urban Indian Health - logo 2020