News Release

Mountain Time Arts

Mountain Time Arts has commissioned seven illuminated teepees to be raised on the south end of Peets Hill from October 8 to 18 in celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day this year. The teepee lodges will be raised by the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council and the Pretty Shield Foundation. The lodges will honor the contributions of American Indians to our community, landscape and rich culture. The teepees will be installed on the ancestral lands of the Bitteroot Salish, Pend d’Oreille, Kootenai, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne, Crow, Chippewa Cree, Assiniboine, Gros Ventre, Dakota and other Indigenous Nations of this region.

Pictured: Seven illuminated teepees are to be raised on the south end of Peets Hill in Bozeman, Montana from October 8 to 18 in celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day 2021.

Pictured: Seven illuminated teepees are to be raised on the south end of Peets Hill in Bozeman, Montana from October 8 to 18 in celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day.

As one of the first supporters of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in the State of Montana, the City of Bozeman, eagerly and graciously permitted the teepees to be raised on Peets Hill. Bozeman’s mayor, Cyndy Andrus will deliver a Land Acknowledgement and her annual Indigenous Peoples Day Proclamation from the teepees this year at 6:15 p.m. on October 11th. Her proclamation renews the city’s commitment to honoring the original stewards of our beautiful landscape.

William (Bill) Snell, Executive Director of the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council, emphasizes that Indigenous Peoples Day is for everyone across the community “We bring hope, respect, and honor to all people when we recognize ’Indigenous Day’. This day is for all people in our nation.”

Francesca Pine-Rodriguez, Executive Co-Director of Mountain Time Arts thinks that. Indigenous Peoples Day is important to everyone in the country in order to understand our nation’s history. “Moving everybody forward together is recognizing real history,” Pine-Rodriguez said. “It’s recognizing that the land you walk on every day was a tribes’ land and is sacred to them. And to recognize it is a minimum. The next step is to honor and celebrate it.”

Bozeman Mayor Cyndy Andrus recognizes the important contributions of indigenous peoples, the rich history, and the contemporary influences that make Bozeman what it is today. “As a city we are committed to making Bozeman a more equitable and inclusive place where all are welcome,” Andrus said. “We’re growing every day, and as we do we must acknowledge and hold space for the indigenous peoples and lands upon which our community is built.” 

The City of Bozeman, Mountain Time Arts, the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council, and the Pretty Shield Foundation welcome everyone to come up to the teepees between October 8 and 18 and celebrate our country’s Indigenous heritage.

Mountain Time Arts is currently seeking volunteers interested in acting as guides during the day for the teepees. Those interested should sign up on at mountaintimearts.org/volunteer

Community members are welcome to make donations to the lighting of the teepees on mountaintimearts.org/illuminating-indigenous-peoples-day or Mountain Time Arts, 104 East Main Street, Suite One, Bozeman, Montana 59715. 

Donations to the Pretty Shield Foundation will be accepted at the teepees and can be made through the Pretty Shield Foundation, 3122 Brayton Street, Billings, Montana 59102. 

Please contact MaryBeth Morand, marybeth@mountaintimearts.org, and Francesca Pine-Rodriguez, francesca@mountaintimearts.org for more information.