Statements on court ruling striking down federal permits for the Dakota Access Pipeline

Pictured: The Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) being installed between farms, as seen from 50th Avenue in New Salem, North Dakota.(Photo: Tony Webster, CC BY-SA 2.0 [creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-sa/2.0])

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A federal court granted a request from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to strike down federal permits for the pipeline

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Lakota People's Law Project

Attorneys for Earthjustice, a law organization representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in the ongoing fight against the Dakota Access pipeline, announced yesterday that a federal court has granted a request from the tribe to strike down federal permits for the pipeline.

The Lakota People’s Law Project continues to stand with Standing Rock and its legal team, and we congratulate the tribe on today’s outcome. Here are a pair of statements from the Lakota Law team in reference to yesterday’s promising ruling.

Chase Iron Eyes, lead counsel for the Lakota People’s Law Project: “This is the correct decision. It’s vindication for the tribe, the water protectors who opposed this dangerous pipeline, and all those who stood with us during our demonstrations and after our false arrests. DAPL should be shut down, and Keystone XL and all new pipeline construction should be halted. The horrible safety records of these oil companies speak for themselves. I’m encouraged, but it’s also important to remember that no matter the outcomes in the courts, we still run the risk of President Trump circumventing separation of powers and exceeding the scope of his authority when it comes to pipelines.”

Phyllis Young, Standing Rock organizer for the Lakota People’s Law Project, who also served as the official liaison to the Oceti Sakowin camp on behalf of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, says: “I’m grateful for this outcome, especially since many of us could not travel to D.C. for the hearing because of the Coronavirus. I want to praise and honor our people, the oyate, for the over half a million statements that were made demanding an Environmental Impact Statement. I want to thank all those who offered to host us in D.C., including Greenpeace, the churches, and military families. I thank Oglala Nation, Cheyenne River, Yankton, and Standing Rock, the oyate from all of these council fires, who were the vanguard in this legal endeavor. Now, the remedy from the court must be to stop and halt the pipeline going through our territory. This remedy is critical for my family, because the backup plan for a spill could push the oil back into Porcupine Creek, which is my front yard. I cannot drink oil. My children cannot live with this backup plan, so there needs to be a better remedy.

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