FCC approves eleventh set of COVID-19 telehealth program applications, includes Indian health clinic

Pictured: Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai.(Photo: fcc.gov)

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Commission continues approving telehealth funding during coronavirus pandemic

News Release

Federal Communications Commission

The Federal Communications Commission’s Wireline Competition Bureau today approved an additional 62 funding applications for the COVID-19 Telehealth Program. Health care providers in both urban and rural areas of the country will use this $23.25 million in funding to provide telehealth services during the coronavirus pandemic. To date, the Federal Communications Commission’s COVID-19 Telehealth Program, which was authorized by the CARES Act, has approved 367 funding applications in 45 states plus Washington, D.C. for a total of $128.23 million in funding.

Below is a list of health care providers that were approved for funding:

  • Agape Health Services, in Washington, North Carolina, was awarded $600,583 for laptop computers, tablets, remote monitoring equipment, and videoconferencing software licenses that will be used to screen high risk patients for COVID-19 and other diseases, remotely monitor vital signs, and facilitate the home diagnosis, assessment and treatment of patients with a monitored telehealth system for each patient and family.
  • Atlantic General Hospital, in Berlin, Maryland, was awarded $515,449 for a patient engagement telehealth platform that provides acute care patient services on a mobile device, such as appointment preparation, education, discharge planning and family notification, and any post-appointment follow-up activities including transmitting prescriptions and test or lab results.
  • Baptist Health Hospital, in Louisville, Kentucky, was awarded $873,982 for a remote telehealth platform, telemedicine carts, computers, tablets, remote monitoring equipment, and videoconferencing equipment to expand the telehealth program at eight Kentucky hospitals and treat COVID-19 patients entirely with specially designed carts that connect critical care physicians remotely to patients without risking further virus spread.
  • Baptist Hospital of Miami, in Miami, Florida, was awarded $1,000,000 for telemedicine carts, videoconferencing equipment and software licenses, and tablets to address the COVID-19 crisis by expanding telehealth intensive care units and by deploying video conferencing for patient consults to reduce in-person care and prevent the spread of the virus.
  • Brookline Community Mental Health Center, in Brookline, Massachusetts, was awarded $19,562 for laptops, videoconferencing software licenses, and an upgraded phone system to continue providing behavioral health evaluation and treatment services to at-risk patients affected by the COVID-19 crisis.
  • Care Plus NJ, in Paramus, New Jersey, was awarded $442,361 for laptops, tablets, smartphones, and a virtual care kiosk to expand virtual services and reduce the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic by allowing staff members to use telehealth from their home or office, and patients to provide information about symptoms, medical history and treatments in a room separate from the health care provider.
  • CARTI Cancer Center, in Little Rock, Arkansas, was awarded $676,416 for tablets, network upgrades, mobile hotspots, desktop computers, and secure patient communications software to enhance oncology care to underserved, rural communities by expanding infrastructure and technology in rural clinics, increase the use of telehealth, and reduce the COVID-19 transmission risks for high-risk oncology patients.
  • Central Neighborhood Health Foundation, in Los Angeles, California, was awarded $281,231 for desktop computers, laptop computers, tablets, telemedicine carts, video monitors, and a telehealth platform subscription to screen and triage patients with COVID-19 symptoms remotely while they are at home or at the health center, to monitor patients with COVID-19 remotely to ensure that symptoms continue to stabilize by checking vital signs remotely, including blood pressure, oxygen saturation, temperature, and pulse rate, and dramatically increase the number of patients without COVID-19 symptoms or conditions who are treated remotely at home.
  • Citrus Health Network, in Hialeah, Florida, was awarded $453,601 for videoconferencing software, computers, laptops, tablets, and network upgrades to institute remote patient treatment to reduce in-person screening for COVID-19 symptoms and provide a virtual workspace so staff working from home can still provide services to patients in need.
  • Coastal Health and Wellness, in Texas City, Texas, was awarded $159,750 for telemedicine carts, a telehealth platform, and smartphones to establish a telehealth program for the current patient population to allow provider-patient consultations for chronic health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and medication management, as well as consultations for mental health conditions.
  • Colorado Rural Health Center, in Aurora, Colorado, was awarded $141,465 for telemedicine carts and videoconferencing equipment and licenses to enable its four rural clinics to provide preventative care, primary care, and behavioral healthcare to patients using telehealth in a variety of care settings to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • Community Health Access Network, in Newmarket, New Hampshire, was awarded $907,383 for remote patient monitoring equipment and software, laptop computers, tablets, and broadband service to enhance telehealth capabilities and continue chronic care management for at risk patients at home by monitoring vital signs including blood pressure, oxygen readings, and breathing.
  • Community Health Association of Spokane, in Spokane, Washington, was awarded $804,641 for remote monitoring equipment, telemedicine carts, laptop computers, videoconferencing equipment, and network upgrades to treat COVID-19 positive patients who do not require hospitalization with telehealth, to provide the full spectrum of primary care services for patients who are following the stay at home order, and to care for patients in need of chronic disease management, urgent care services, and mental health and substance use disorder counseling.
  • Comprehensive Healthcare, in Yakima, Washington, was awarded $421,748 for tablets, mobile hotspots, laptop computers, videoconferencing equipment, and network upgrades to provide medically necessary services to clients in-home, in-community, and in its facilities to ensure continued access to care for behavioral health concerns, including medication management, psychiatric evaluations, substance use disorder assessments, and other problems.
  • Covenant Health Alliance of Pennsylvania, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, was awarded $362,550 for telemedicine carts, tablets, laptop computers, and a telehealth platform to reduce exposing high-risk senior patients to COVID-19, to provide immediate care to senior patients who have been diagnosed with COVID-19, and to offer a continuum of care using telehealth for seniors throughout the skilled nursing, assisted living, independent living, and memory care units.
  • Deckerville Community Hospital, in Deckerville, Michigan, was awarded $23,218 for desktop and laptop computers, videoconferencing equipment and software, and a telehealth platform subscription that will help optimize patient access by expanding existing telehealth offerings for routine care so patients can be seen out of the office and reduce exposure to COVID-19.
  • Dimock Community Health Center, in Roxbury, Massachusetts, was awarded $193,645 for telemedicine carts, remote monitoring equipment, and videoconferencing equipment and software licenses to offer virtual well visits for adults and children, remote developmental assessments for children, telepsychiatry and teletherapy for anxiety, depression and addiction treatment, and with remote monitoring, chronic disease management for diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and heart disease.
  • East Valley Community Health Center, in West Covina, California, was awarded $219,251 for desktop computers, videoconferencing equipment, network upgrades, and a telehealth platform license that will support telehealth capabilities that make it easier for patients to access care, such as family medicine for adults and children, chronic disease management, nutrition counseling, behavioral health, and other medical services, and will also allow health care providers to more efficiently document and maintain a high standard of care for the patient.
  • Excelsior Springs Hospital and Clinics, in Excelsior Springs, Missouri, was awarded $995,000 for remote monitoring and diagnostic equipment that can be deployed to patient homes or other locations in the rural community to provide continued monitoring and evaluation of patients, as well as immediate, around-the-clock access to physicians, specialists, and other health care providers that otherwise would not be available in many communities.
  • Faith Regional Health Services, in Norfolk, Nebraska, was awarded $241,200 for remote monitoring equipment to expand the existing telehealth network and focus remote care on COVID-19 patients and others who lack the necessary data for assessment in their home, to avoid unnecessary in-person hospital visits, and to treat patients with chronic conditions, easing the strain on hospital capacity and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 without sacrificing quality care.
  • Family and Children’s Services, in Elizabeth, New Jersey, was awarded $14,253 for laptop computers, smartphones, and videoconferencing software to continue to offer outpatient mental health counseling by licensed social workers and counselors with telehealth capabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Family Counseling Service of Aurora, in Aurora, Illinois, was awarded $14,306 for laptop computers to expand telehealth options for patients by allowing staff to remotely conduct mental health counseling and assist with psychiatric medication evaluation and management.
  • Family Healthcare Network, in Porterville, California, was awarded $325,637 for laptop computers, network upgrades, and a telehealth software license to continue providing primary care and specialty services via telehealth, including dental, pharmacy, and optometry, to a high-risk patient population in 35 locations.
  • FCCH South Valley Family Health Commons, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was awarded $376,621 for network upgrades, telecommunications equipment, and telehealth and business software licenses that will allow for electronic patient registration, improved patient communication through a consolidated platform, increased health care provider productivity, and the ability to provide video conferencing for patients and providers.
  • Flushing Clinic, in Flushing, New York, was awarded $94,972 for laptops and software licenses and will use remote video conferencing to serve existing individual and group patients, conduct medication monitoring, and conduct psychiatric evaluations for new patients.
  • Four Rivers Behavioral Health, in Paducah, Kentucky, was awarded $4,831 for connected devices and video conferencing equipment to offer remote behavioral health services to individuals with COVID-19 at their home or in a medical facility.
  • Franklin Primary Health Center, in Mobile, Alabama, was awarded $587,021 for telehealth platforms, tablet workstations, mobile hotspots, telemedicine carts, videoconferencing equipment and software licenses, and network upgrades so all health care providers will be able to provide both voice and telehealth video visits to patients, regardless of the location of the patient or the provider, which will provide flexibility for patients, maintain access to care, and reduce cancellations.
  • Gateway Community Health Center, in Laredo, Texas, was awarded $135,594 for tablets, a telehealth platform, and other software licenses to use telehealth capabilities to provide routine and non-urgent healthcare services to patients, such as chronic care, acute care, and mental health care to reach thousands of patients with telehealth services.
  • Hearts for Hearing Foundation, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was awarded $114,123 for laptop computers, mobile hotpots, assistive hearing devices, and network upgrades to provide remote speech pathology and audiology services outside of the clinical setting to pediatric and high-risk patients.
  • Henry Ford Health System, in Detroit, Michigan, was awarded $715,723 for a telehealth platform, network upgrades, videoconferencing software, and laptop computers to safely monitor and treat COVID-19 patients, patients that do not have COVID-19 but require care through telehealth services, and to offer via telehealth behavioral health care and emotional support services to patients and their families affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Henry J. Austin Health Center, in Trenton, New Jersey, was awarded $223,485 for telemedicine carts and network and telecommunications upgrades to continue providing comprehensive primary care, mental and behavioral health care, and substance use disorder care during the COVID-19 crisis.
  • Hillsides, in Los Angeles, California, was awarded $225,359 for laptops, videoconferencing software licenses, and web cameras to overcome cost barriers to expanding virtual medical services for persons and communities impacted by COVID-19, particularly those at highest risks, including virtual mental health counseling, care coordination and psychiatric services.
  • Hospital for Special Surgery, in New York, New York, was awarded $596,045 for telemedicine carts, remote patient monitoring equipment, a telehealth platform, videoconferencing equipment, and tablet computers to safely care for COVID-19 patients by deploying monitoring and virtual visit technology to ensure appropriate communication between COVID-19 patients and clinical teams, to provide care continuity for patients who require ongoing medical management, and to establish infrastructure for COVID-19 inpatients to communicate with family members and medical professionals through tablets at the bedside.
  • Labette Health Medical Group, in Parsons, Kansas, was awarded $109,344 for videoconferencing equipment, telehealth software, telemedicine carts, and laptop computers to provide COVID-19 screenings, with testing for infection as required, and other critical operations through telehealth, such as wellness and annual visits, sick visits, medication refills, and specialty consultations.
  • Maimonides Medical Center, in Brooklyn, New York, was awarded $1,000,000 for a telehealth platform, a remote patient monitoring platform, telemedicine carts that will be deployed at newly configured remote inpatient sites as part of response to the surge in patient volume due to the COVID-19 emergency, and remote monitoring equipment installed in COVID-19 inpatient rooms to reduce the staff required to manage intensive care units, to allow clinicians to quickly make critical healthcare decisions and initiate appropriate intervention based on alerts generated from central monitoring.
  • Marion Area Counseling Center, in Marion, Ohio, was awarded $33,216 for laptop and desktop computers and video monitors to use telehealth to reach existing and new high-risk and vulnerable patients to treat serious and persistent mental illness issues, substance use disorder, and other behavioral health conditions.
  • Marshfield Medical Center, in Marshfield, Wisconsin, was awarded $1,000,000 for videoconferencing equipment and software, a telehealth platform subscription, laptop computers, and network upgrades to focus telehealth efforts on restoring primary and specialty care services impacted by COVID-19 and maintaining health care provider access to the most critical patients with chronic illnesses at 81 health care facilities in Wisconsin and upper Michigan.
  • Meridian Behavioral Healthcare, in Gainesville, Florida, was awarded $63,700 for mobile hotspots, tablets, videoconferencing software and network upgrades to enable remote consultations and treatment for patient behavioral health problems throughout 11 counties in North Central Florida.
  • The Metrohealth System, in Cleveland, Ohio, was awarded $914,049 for tablet computers, telehealth platform subscriptions, remote monitoring equipment, videoconferencing equipment, and mobile hotspots to use remote monitoring to enable care for patients, including those with COVID-19, via secure, bidirectional video telehealth exams, and to use connected devices so health care providers can provide care for all COVID-19 and chronic care patients using telehealth.
  • Midwestern Colorado Mental Health Center, in Montrose, Colorado, was awarded $149,339 for laptop and desktop computers, videoconferencing equipment and software, and smartphones so health care providers can diagnose and treat patients for a variety of behavioral health conditions and provide a small number of acutely ill patients with a smartphone and conferencing application to maintain care remotely.
  • Mission City Community Network, in North Hills, California, was awarded $308,471 for smartphones, laptop computers, tablets, network upgrades, and remote monitoring equipment to provide patients with monitoring equipment for use at home and tablets for home use for high-risk patients to help manage care needs without coming to the clinic.
  • Morristown Medical Center, in Morristown, New Jersey, was awarded $827,637 for laptop computers, tablets, videoconferencing equipment and software, and remote monitoring equipment to support a system-wide telehealth COVID-19 response program for six hospitals that will provide hospital and ambulatory care to directly support COVID-19 remote treatment, plus diagnostics and remote patient monitoring to care for patients in COVID-19 isolation rooms and in outpatient settings to minimize exposure.
  • NARA Indian Health Clinic, in Portland, Oregon, was awarded $342,346 for smartphones, laptops, tablets, wireless data plans, and videoconferencing equipment and software licenses to maintain patient care by distributing connected devices to elders, families with children in need of care, patients with chronic health and mental health illness histories, and pregnant women so patients can stay connected with their health care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Northern NY Rural Behavioral Health Institute, in Saranac Lake, New York, was awarded $55,180 for a telemedicine cart, tablets, video monitors, and remote monitoring equipment to continue to serve at-risk patients in rural New York with chronic health conditions, including remote primary care, rehabilitation, and addiction recovery support services.
  • Northwest Human Services, in Salem, Oregon, was awarded $45,000 for desktop and laptop computers and videoconferencing equipment with which it can continue to provide primary care services to patients using telehealth capabilities and concentrate clinic resources on preparation, response, testing, and education around COVID-19.
  • Oregon Health and Science University, in Portland, Oregon, was awarded $372,757 for tablet computers, videoconferencing software, and telehealth platform subscriptions to reduce the prospect of COVID-19 exposure for patients and providers by allowing providers, even those in quarantine, to continue to provide patient care virtually, and to maintain remote treatment and diagnosis practices for low-risk COVID-19 patients to prevent them from spreading the virus to other patients and healthcare workers.
  • Project Access Foundation at Biscayne Medical Center, in Miami, Florida, was awarded $55,260 for laptop computers, mobile hotspots, smartphones, and videoconferencing equipment to provide immediate screening and primary care services to those exhibiting or self-reporting COVID-19 symptoms and use telehealth services to care for COVID-19 and chronic care patients by monitoring treatment and medication and preventing unnecessary hospitalizations.
  • Providence St. Joseph Health Consortium, in Renton, Washington, was awarded $105,000 for a remote monitoring platform license that will help manage the care and treatment of up to 4,000 patients in six states, including Alaska and Montana, who are home with COVID-19 symptoms, including the ability to see patient vital signs and communicate with patients who may require hospital admission.
  • Rosalind Franklin University Health Clinic, in North Chicago, Illinois, was awarded $18,250 for tablet computers and network upgrades to conduct COVID-19 testing and use telehealth for follow-up for quarantined patients, as well as voice and video consults for all behavioral health patients to eliminate office visits during the pandemic.
  • Serenity First Counseling, in Green Valley, Arizona, was awarded $40,202 for desktop and laptop computers, video conferencing equipment and software, and broadband service to offer treatment for behavioral health and substance use conditions using telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic for patients who had been receiving in-person treatment and for new patients experiencing mental health and substance use issues because of the pandemic.
  • SERV Behavioral Health System, in Clifton, New Jersey, was awarded $37,193 for tablets, telehealth software licenses, videoconferencing equipment, and desktop computers to continue providing mental health services using remote capabilities to clients with confirmed cases of COVID-19 as well as those who do not have COVID-19 symptoms but are in need of behavioral health care and treatment.
  • Silvercrest Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, in Briarwood, New York, was awarded $631,795 for telemedicine carts, tablets, videoconferencing equipment, and telehealth software licenses to provide video consultations and telehealth capabilities for specialty services to high-risk patients, such as neurology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and rehabilitation care, and to expand remote treatment of COVID-19 patients and maintain access to care.
  • Sojourns Community Clinic, in Westminster, Vermont, was awarded $43,411 for network upgrades and videoconferencing equipment and software to expand medical services via telehealth and offer primary care, family medicine, treatment of acute and chronic illness, and outpatient physical rehabilitation services for over 5,000 individuals and families in Vermont and New Hampshire.
  • SWLA Center for Health Services, in Lake Charles, Louisiana, was awarded $793,274 for a remote patient monitoring platform and equipment, telemedicine carts, and laptop computers to screen and treat patients with COVID-19 symptoms at its clinic locations and to use remote monitoring for other patients, especially those with chronic diseases, to ensure they are maintaining glucose levels, controlling high blood pressure, and otherwise keeping healthy without the patients having to track their own vital signs or report back to the clinic in person.
  • Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was awarded $922,688 for tablets, computers, and remote monitoring equipment to offer patient-based internet-connected remote monitoring for blood pressure, pulse oximetry, weight, and glucose levels to manage chronic diseases and COVID-19 related symptoms, to perform video consultations with both regular outpatient providers as well as with emergency physicians for assessment of acute problems related to COVID-19 or other acute illnesses, and other remote treatment for chronic conditions via telehealth and ongoing remote patient monitoring.
  • Unicare Community Health Center, in Ontario, California, was awarded $281,124 for desktop and laptop computers and network upgrades to enable continuity of patient care regardless of the location of the health care provider and for a patient population over 90% of which is considered high-risk for COVID-19.
  • University of Colorado Health, in Aurora, Colorado, was awarded $998,250 for wearable remote monitoring devices so staff in the ICU and other departments can track their own temperature and other vital signs to reduce COVID-19 infections, and for patient monitoring devices that allow staff to conduct remote patient care.
  • UPMC Magee Women’s Hospital, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was awarded $85,234 for laptop computers and videoconferencing software licenses to expand existing telehealth capabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide a broad spectrum of treatment and care options for COVID-19 patients.
  • UPMC Mercy, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was awarded $67,958 for laptop computers and videoconferencing licenses to increase the number of telehealth visits for COVID-19 patients while reducing the risk to providers and patients of contracting the virus.
  • UPMC Passavant, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was awarded $12,591 for smartphones, data plans, and remote monitoring applications to allow safe monitoring of COVID-19 patients and patients suffering from other diseases to reduce hospital visits and facilitate social distancing.
  • Virginia Mason Memorial Hospital, in Yakima, Washington, was awarded $390,611 for telemedicine carts, a telehealth platform, laptops, tablets, videoconferencing equipment and software, and network upgrades to use telehealth to reduce face-to-face medical interactions and limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus in the hospital both within the hospital emergency department, where tablets and video connections to physicians limit patient contact, and in outpatient settings where patients are able to stay in their car while they teleconference via tablet with their health care provider.
  • West Virginia United Health System, in Morgantown, West Virginia, was awarded $780,899 for network upgrades, telemedicine carts, tablets, laptops, and videoconferencing equipment and software licenses to conduct virtual visits with patients in their homes, to give inpatients the ability to use devices to talk with their families who are unable to visit due to distancing requirements, and to offer health care opportunities in remote locations to prevent the patient from traveling and risking exposure at the clinic.

To learn more about the FCC’s COVID-19 Telehealth Program and view a complete list of funding recipients to date, visit https://www.fcc.gov/covid19telehealth. 

To learn more about the FCC’s Keep Americans Connected Initiative, visit https://www.fcc.gov/keepamericansconnected.

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