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News Release

Anishinabek Nation

Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Reg Niganobe encourages everyone to take the time during the 7th annual Treaties Recognition Week to learn about treaties, First Nation governance, connection to land and water, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) with the new online Secondary School resource available for all learners.

“The Anishinabek Nation recognizes Treaties Recognition Week as an opportunity for people in the province to heighten their understanding of our relationship protocols,” states Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Reg Niganobe. “Treaties are more than written agreements, they were made with the spirit and intent of creating mutually respectful relationships, outlining responsibilities and obligations for all of us. Awareness is key to fostering an equitable relationship. We hope resources such as Gdoo-Sastamoo Kii Mi: Understanding our Nation-to-Nation Relationship will lead to a higher awareness of treaties that will continue to flourish with the younger generations.”

Treaties Recognition Week is the first week of November every year. Treaties Recognition Week honours the importance of treaties and helps Ontarians learn more about treaty rights and treaty relationships. The education and awareness of treaties made with First Nations will help Canadian citizens understand their own obligations as subjects of treaty conditions in this country.

The day also marks the official launch of Gdoo-Sastamoo Kii Mi: Understanding our Nation-to-Nation Relationship, an online secondary education resource aimed at fostering effective learning, creating a historically-accurate narrative, and building a true nation-to-nation relationship.

“There are a number of Treaties within Anishinabek territory and education is a key component in generating an improved understanding of what these agreements encompass,” states Anishinabek Nation Southeast Regional Deputy Grand Council Chief James Marsden. “It is the obligation of all Treaty partners to understand the collective responsibilities to the land and to each other. We are proud to support the launch of Gdoo-Sastamoo Kii Mi: Understanding our Nation-to-Nation Relationship as an essential knowledge tool that will benefit students in creating meaningful comprehension of Treaties.”

Treaty educator Kelly Crawford worked jointly with Frame Sequence Photography to build on the secondary school teacher’s kit: Gdoo-Sastamoo Kii Mi: Understanding our Nation-to-Nation Relationship and connect to the Ontario Curriculum for a co-education journey through the development of another online education resource. All education resources produced by the Anishinabek Nation are made for diverse learners — not just First Nations students and teachers.

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“It is so important to bring Elders, Knowledge Keepers, and community voices into all classrooms,” says Crawford. “Students need to understand different worldviews and be taught accurate histories of these lands. This resource guides the user to engage in learning and encourages them to ask hard questions. Having the resource online increases accessibility.”

Minister of Indigenous Affairs Ontario Greg Rickford acknowledges the importance of treaty education. 

“Understanding the role that treaties play in the creation of Ontario is a vital step in reconciliation efforts,” says Greg Rickford, Minister of Indigenous Affairs. “I am grateful to Anishinabek Nation for their continued leadership in developing educational resources that help build awareness of treaties and their importance. These educational tools can help everyone understand the promises and connections that are still so critical to relationships for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people today.”

The Anishinabek Nation is committed to supporting a clear and responsible understanding of the treaty relationship and will continue to observe Treaties Recognition Week from November 7–11 by sharing information and resources virtually through its social media channels and the Anishinabek News.

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About Anishinabek Nation

The Anishinabek Nation is a political advocate for 39 member First Nations across Ontario, representing approximately 65,000 citizens. The Anishinabek Nation is the oldest political organization in Ontario and can trace its roots back to the Confederacy of Three Fires, which existed long before European contact. 

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