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The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Dr. Anthony Fauci predicts by April it will be "open season" for vaccinations in the U.S., as supply boosts allow most people to get shots to protect against COVID-19.

Speaking to NBC's "Today Show," Fauci, who serves as science adviser to President joe Biden, says the rate of vaccinations will greatly accelerate in the coming months. He credits forthcoming deliveries of the two approved vaccines, the potential approval of a third and moves taken by the Biden administration to increase the nation's capacity to deliver doses.

He says, "by the time we get to April," it will be "open season, namely virtually everybody and anybody in any category could start to get vaccinated."

He cautioned it will take "several more months" to logistically deliver injections to adult Americans but predicted herd immunity could be achieved by late summer.

Chilling video footage becomes key exhibit in Trump trial

WASHINGTON — Chilling security video of last month's deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, including of rioters searching menacingly for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Mike Pence, has become a key exhibit in Donald Trump's impeachment trial as lawmakers prosecuting the case wrap up their opening arguments for why Trump should be convicted of inciting the siege.

The House will continue with its case Thursday, with Trump's lawyers set to launch their defense by week's end.

The footage shown at trial, much of it never before seen, has included video of the mob smashing into the building, distraught members of Congress receiving comfort, rioters engaging in hand-to-hand combat with police and audio of Capitol police officers pleading for back-up. It underscored how dangerously close the rioters came to the nation's leaders, shifting the focus of the trial from an academic debate about the Constitution to a raw retelling of the Jan. 6 assault.

Videos of the siege have been circulating since the day of the riot, but the graphic compilation shown to senators Wednesday amounted to a more complete narrative, a moment-by-moment retelling of one of the nation's most alarming days. It offered fresh details into the attackers, scenes of police heroism and staff whispers of despair.

The footage included rioters roaming the halls chanting "Hang Mike Pence," some equipped with combat gear. Outside, the mob had set up a makeshift gallows. And in one wrenching moment, police were shown shooting and killing a San Diego woman, Ashli Babbitt, as the mob tried to break through doors near the House Chamber.

Trump can't hang on to lawyers after false election claims

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump spent much of his career deploying high-powered lawyers to do his bidding. Now he is having trouble finding top-tier help when he might need it most.

Since losing the November election to President Joe Biden, Trump has been hemorrhaging attorneys. Established firms backed away from his baseless claims of election fraud. Those he did retain made elementary errors in cases that were quickly rejected as meritless. His personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was ridiculed for his performance before a federal judge during one election-related case. 

His legal options contesting the election exhausted, Trump still needed a team to represent him in his historic second impeachment trial on a charge that he incited the deadly Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot. A team of South Carolina lawyers was retained, then backed out, so Trump was left with a lawyer from Pennsylvania and another from Alabama, giving them only days to prepare. 

High-profile clients are typically strong pulls for ambitious lawyers, but Trump's rocky relationships with his attorneys show the limits of taking on cases with dubious merits. His allegations of fraud were rejected by courts, his attorney general and other prominent Republicans.

Trump's impeachment lawyers started off their defense by misspelling the words "United States" in their brief. And their initial presentation during the trial was panned by even some of Trump's most ardent supporters. 

'Overwhelm the problem': Inside Biden's war on COVID-19

WASHINGTON — The meetings begin each day not long after dawn. Dozens of aides report in, coffee in hand, joining by Zoom from agency headquarters, their homes or even adjacent offices.

The sessions start with the latest sobering statistics meant to focus the work and offer a reminder of what's at stake: new coronavirus cases, people in hospitals, deaths. But they also include the latest signs of progress: COVID-19 tests administered, vaccine doses shipped, shots injected.

Where the last administration addressed the pandemic with the vernacular of a natural disaster — using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's mantra of a "federally supported, state managed and locally executed" response — Biden's team is borrowing from the Pentagon and the doctrine of overwhelming force.

"We're at war with this virus," COVID-19 coordinator Jeff Zients said in an interview with The Associated Press between Sunday morning meetings on the response. "We're taking every resource and tool the federal government has to battle on every front."

It's a strategy facing urgent tests after Biden inherited an inconsistent vaccine distribution plan and with the emerging threats from new virus variants.

Digital siege: Internet cuts become favored tool of regimes

LONDON — When army generals in Myanmar staged a coup last week, they briefly cut internet access in an apparent attempt to stymie protests. In Uganda, residents couldn't use Facebook, Twitter and other social media for weeks after a recent election. And in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region, the internet has been down for months amid a wider conflict.

Around the world, shutting down the internet has become an increasingly popular tactic of repressive and authoritarian regimes and some illiberal democracies. Digital rights groups say governments use them to stifle dissent, silence opposition voices or cover up human rights abuses, raising concerns about restricting freedom of speech.

Regimes often cut online access in response to protests or civil unrest, particularly around elections, as they try to keep their grip on power by restricting the flow of information, researchers say. It's the digital equivalent of seizing control of the local TV and radio station that was part of the pre-internet playbook for despots and rebels. 

"Internet shutdowns have been massively underreported or misreported over the years," said Alp Toker, founder of internet monitoring organization Netblocks. The world is "starting to realize what's happening," as documenting efforts like his expand, he said. 

Last year there were 93 major internet shutdowns in 21 countries, according to a report by Top10VPN, a U.K.-based digital privacy and security research group. The list doesn't include places like China and North Korea, where the government tightly controls or restricts the internet. Shutdowns can range from all-encompassing internet blackouts to blocking social media platforms or severely throttling internet speeds, the report said. 

'We'll be left without families': Fear in Ethiopia's Tigray

NAIROBI, Kenya — As soldiers from Eritrea looted the border town of Rama in Ethiopia's Tigray region, one home became a dispensary for frightened residents seeking medicine in the midst of war. In return, they shared details of killings in nearby communities. An American nurse visiting her family listened in shock.

Now, after escaping to her home in Colorado, she struggled to estimate the number of dead. "I don't know, 1,000?" she told The Associated Press. "It was a lot, just in the rural areas." She has been unable to reach her parents since leaving. 

If the fighting doesn't end soon, she said, "we'll be left without families."

Rare witness accounts are illuminating the toll of the shadowy conflict in Tigray, which is largely cut off from the world as fighting enters a fourth month in a region of 6 million people. Ethiopian forces and allied fighters pursue the fugitive former leaders of Tigray who long dominated Ethiopia's government. Each side sees the other as illegitimate after last year's national elections were delayed and Tigray defiantly held its own.

Soldiers from neighboring Eritrea, a secretive nation and enemy of the former Tigray leaders, are deeply involved, though Ethiopia and Eritrea deny their presence. The European Union this week joined the United States in urging Eritrea to withdraw its forces, asserting they are "reportedly committing atrocities and exacerbating ethnic violence."

In UK, roving teams bring COVID-19 vaccine shots to homeless

LONDON — In a pandemic, homeless people face being more forgotten than they already are. But not by doctors like Dr. Anil Mehta, who is on a mission to bring the coronavirus vaccine to those hardest to reach and often most at risk of getting sick in east London.

Mehta, a general practitioner, and his small team of doctors and nurses have been showing up at homeless centers in his local area, a COVID-19 hot spot, offering a free jab to dozens who might otherwise get left behind in Britain's mass vaccination drive.

"They will get missed if we don't find them proactively," Mehta said. "They really don't have anything going for them, in terms of medical care. Finding them is absolutely essential to what we need to achieve in our boroughs."

The homeless aren't listed among the British government's highest priority groups for the vaccine rollout — which currently include people over 70, nursing home residents, front-line medical staff and social care workers, as well as the clinically vulnerable. 

Because those sleeping outside and people in shelters have no address that doctors can contact them at, some local authorities across Britain have begun sending out roving vaccination teams to identify the clinically vulnerable among them so they can have access to the jab.

Reports: Mori to resign Tokyo Olympics over sexist remarks

TOKYO — The long saga of Yoshiro Mori appears to be near the end.

Japan's Kyodo news agency and others reported on Thursday — citing unnamed sources "familiar with the matter" — that Yoshiro Mori will step down on Friday as the president of the Tokyo Olympic organizing committee.

The move follows his sexist comments about women more than a week ago, and an ensuing and rare public debate in Japan about gender equality. They also come just over five months before the Olympics are to open.

A decision is expected to be announced on Friday when the organizing committee's executive board meets. The executive board is overwhelming male, as is the day-to-day leadership.

The 83-year-old Mori, in a meeting of the Japanese Olympic Committee more than a week ago, essentially said women "talk too much" and are driven by a "strong sense of rivalry." Mori, a former prime minister, gave a grudging apology a few days after his opinions were reported but declined to resign.