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The balance of new Indigenous leadership

How an NFL name change affects Indian Country. Plus, three Indigenous women are changing the face of leadership. And it's time to rock your mocs and dance your style with Northern Cree
Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe 2022 (photo courtesy of Holly Cook Macarro)

Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe

It’s official, the Washington NFL football team is now known as the Commanders. The change comes after a half century of work by Native rights advocates who urged team owners to abandon its former derogatory name. Red Lake Band of Ojibwe citizen and political commentator Holly Cook Macarro reflects on this decision. She is a partner with Spirit Rock Consulting.

Pictured: Amber Torres, Chairman of the Walker River Paiute Tribe. - Amber Torres is chairman of the Walker River Paiute Tribe. (Photo: Amber Torres)

Chairman Amber Torres, Walker River Paiute Tribe

With the Super Bowl just around the corner, the Walker River Paiute in Nevada will be cheering on the Los Angeles Rams, and watching tribal citizen Austin Corbett play in the big game. Chairman Amber Torres joins the show to share her elation for Corbett.

JAN 2022: Elizabeth Reese, Nambe Pueblo, is the first Native faculty member at Stanford University's law school. (Photo courtesy of Reese) - Elizabeth Reese, Nambe Pueblo, is the first Native faculty member at Stanford University's law school. (Photo courtesy of Reese)

Elizabeth Reese, Nambe Pueblo

Stanford University’s law school had never had a Native faculty member. That is until Nambe Pueblo citizen Elizabeth Reese was hired as an assistant professor of law. She tells us more about her journey. 

Pictured: Dr. Cynthia Chavez Lamar (Photo: courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

Dr. Cynthia Chavez Lamar, San Felipe Pueblo

Cynthia Chavez Lamar is the incoming leader for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The San Felipe Pueblo citizen talks about how her childhood impacts her life today.

Colleen Echohawk is executive director of the Chief Seattle Club. She is Pawnee and Athabascan. Monday she announced that she’s a candidate to be Seattle’s next mayor. (Campaign photo by Ulysses Curry.) - Colleen Echohawk, Pawnee, executive director of the Chief Seattle Club, says her failed bid to be Seattle's next mayor brought unheard voices to the region. Echohawk came in third in the Aug. 3, 2021 primary election among 15 candidates, with only the top two advancing to the Nov. 2 general election. She was one of two Indigenous candidates on the ballot: Seattle's deputy mayor, Casey Sixkiller, also made a run for the office. (Photo by Ulysses Curry, courtesy of Echohawk campaign)

Colleen Echohawk, Pawnee

There is new leadership at Seattle-based art and lifestyle brand Eighth Generation which is owned by the Snoqualmie Tribe. Colleen EchoHawk has served as the executive director of the Chief Seattle Club and she was a mayoral candidate for the city last year and is ready to talk about the future of the brand.

Steve Wood (center) and the Northern Cree Singers

The Northern Cree Singers


The Grammy nominated drum group Northern Cree from Canada was recently featured on NPR's Tiny Desk meets globalFEST. The group was formed 40 years ago by the Wood Brothers from Saddle Lake Cree Nation. We'll hear their performance of “The Dream” by Leroy Whitstone.

  • The National Congress of American Indians Executive Committee held a special election to fill its Recording Secretary position. 
  • A Senate hearing is focusing on what Indigenous people have been saying for a long time. 
  • This year’s National Tribal Public Health Summit will be all virtual. 
  • February's National Wear Red Day is a time to support Indigenous women's heart health.

Find more details on these headlines at the top of today's show.

ICT NEWSCAST WITH ALIYAH CHAVEZ LOGO

Today's newscast was created with help from:

Aliyah Chavez, Kewa Pueblo, is the anchor of the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @aliyahjchavez.

Shirley Sneve, Ponca/Sicangu Lakota, is vice president of broadcasting for Indian Country Today. Follow her on Twitter @rosebudshirley She’s based in Nebraska and Minnesota.

R. Vincent Moniz, Jr., NuÉta, is a producer for the ICT newscast. Have a great story you've just got to share? Pitch it to vmoniz@indiancountrytoday.com.

Patty Talahongva, Hopi, is senior correspondent for Indian Country Today. Follow her on Twitter: @WiteSpider.

Kaitlin Onawa Boysel, Cherokee, is a producer/reporter for Indian Country Today. On Instagram: @KaitlinBoysel Boysel is based in South Carolina.

Maxwell Montour, Pottawatomi, is a newscast editor for Indian Country Today. On Instagram: max.montour Montour is based in Phoenix.

Mary Grace Pewewardy, Hopi/Comanche/Kiowa, is an intern at Indian Country Today. On Instagram: @mgpewewardy. Pewewardy is based in Phoenix, and enjoys playing video games.

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