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Leaders meet on energy policy

On the Monday edition of the ICT Newscast, the seventh annual tribal energy summit starts this week and the Yurok tribe is also hosting a summit on missing and murdered Indigenous relatives. We get a preview of those events. More on the life expectancy drop for Native people
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Indigenous leaders gather for a nation-to-nation conversation this week. The two-day Tribal Energy Summit starts Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Over 400 registered participants will meet with key leaders from the Department of Energy to talk about the transition to clean energy. ICT’s Shirley Sneve spoke to Wahleah Johns, director of the Office of Indian Energy.

Tomorrow the Yurok Tribe in northern California will host its First Annual tribal summit on Missing and Murdered Indigenous People. The tribe is looking for answers to this issue, said Joseph James, the chairman of the Yurok Tribe.

Laudan Aron is a senior fellow in the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute. She has spent over 25 years conducting research and policy analysis on social welfare issues. That includes on health and disability, education, homelessness, and family violence. She talks about life expectancy changes for Indigenous people in the wake of COVID-19.

A slice of our Indigenous world

  • Indian Country lost two elders this weekend. The family of Sacheen Littlefeather confirms she died this weekend after a long battle with cancer. She came to prominence in 1973 when Marlon Brando asked her to refuse his Best Actor Oscar for the movie, "The Godfather." She was 75.
  • Kevin Locke died unexpectedly this weekend in Custer, South Dakota. He was a world-renowned hoop dancer and traditional flute player. He was also a strong advocate for the revitalization of the Lakota/Dakota language.
  • Canada’s second year honoring its National Day for Truth and Reconciliation was Friday. It aims to remember the legacy of the country’s residential schools where many Indigenous children were forced to attend. It has been nicknamed Orange Shirt Day, which is the color supported by the movement.

  • In Arizona, there are new developments in the case of a Hopi woman who was fatally stabbed. Fabian Durazo has been sentenced to 50 years in prison. In 2019, Durazo was a passenger that was being driven by Lyft driver Kristina Howato. After dropping him off, Durazo reportedly fatally stabbed Howato. 

  • There are various Indigenous nations in the U.S. working to repair lands that were altered by European colonization. A project is currently underway to restore the land of the Wampanoag. The People of the First Light hope to once again practice ceremonies and gather near the animals and plants they consider relatives. ICT’s Vincent Moniz reports.

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Today’s newscast was created with work from:

Shirley Sneve, Ponca/Sicangu Lakota, is vice president of broadcasting for Indian Country Today. Follow her on Twitter @rosebudshirley She’s based in Nebraska and Minnesota.

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Aliyah Chavez, Kewa Pueblo, is the anchor of the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @aliyahjchavez.

R. Vincent Moniz, Jr., NuÉta, is the senior producer of the ICT newscast. Have a great story? Pitch it to vincent@ictnews.org.

McKenzie Allen-Charmley, Dena’ina Athabaskan, is a producer of the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @mallencharmley

Drea Yazzie, Diné, is a producer/editor for the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @quindreayazzie Yazzie is based in Phoenix.

Maxwell Montour, Pottawatomi, is a newscast editor for Indian Country Today. On Instagram: max.montour Montour is based in Phoenix.

Kaitlin Onawa Boysel, Cherokee, is a producer/reporter for Indian Country Today. On Instagram: @KaitlinBoysel Boysel is based in Tulsa, Oklahoma

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