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Conference Indians are back!

We’ll see what’s on the agenda for the Reservation Economic Summit and the National Indian Gaming Association. Plus, traditional foods are finding their way to a fine dining restaurant in Phoenix.

This week, ICT Editor Mark Trahant is in Las Vegas for two of Indian Country's biggest conferences. Today he's stopping by the Reservation Economic Summit. He's talking with Chris James, who's the president and CEO of the National Center for American Indian Economic Development.

Victor Rocha is chairman of the trade show for the National Indian Gaming Association and also the publisher pechanga.net. This week NIGA's conference launches with a return to a way of normalcy with many people coming together in a really big way.

A slice of our Indigenous world

  • The United States Department of Agriculture is announcing a repeal of the Trump era decision made in 2020 regarding the Alaska Roadless Rule. 
  • Traditional and non-traditional crops, and their stories, make their way from Native farms to Native restaurants. Carina Dominguez reports. 
  • This weekend in Phoenix two major sporting events included Native athletes and dancers with teams from the MLB and the NBA. 
  • And on Sunday, the Arizona Diamondbacks hosted Native American Recognition Day at Chase Field.

Find more details on these stories at the top of today's show.

Thank you for watching!

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Mark Trahant, Shoshone-Bannock, is editor of Indian Country Today. On Twitter: @TrahantReports Trahant is based in Phoenix. 

Patty Talahongva, Hopi, is executive producer of Indian Country Today. Follow her on Twitter: @WiteSpider.

Carina Dominguez, Pascua Yaqui, is a correspondent for Indian Country Today Newscast. On Instagram: @CarinaNicole7 Carina is based in Phoenix and New York.

Indian Country Today is a nonprofit news organization. Will you support our work? All of our content is free. There are no subscriptions or costs. And we have hired more Native journalists in the past year than any news organization ─ and with your help we will continue to grow and create career paths for our people. Support Indian Country Today for as little as $10.