101 years of voting rights (white women only)

In 1988, Jeanne Givens, Coeur d’Alene, became the first Native woman to run for Congress. Before that, she was the first Native woman to be elected to the Idaho House in 1982. Givens is pictured on set after an Indian Country Today interview near Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Patty Talahongva)

Indian Country Today

June 4, 1919, is the 101st anniversary of the 19th Amendment giving white women the right to vote

White women rallied ahead of the 1920 election to get the right to vote. Ironically, that election, like the 2020 election came in the midst of a pandemic, and in 1920, it came on the heels of the first World War. 

Native Americans were excluded from the 19th Amendment and it took decades for tribes in every state to become eligible to vote.

Once they did secure that right, very few Native Americans ran for office. 

In the 1980s Jeanne Givens, a Coeur d'Alene woman, served in the Idaho state legislature, then she set her sight on the U.S. Congress. Givens became the first Native American woman to run for a national office. 

She reflects on her career and shares her thoughts on the upcoming 2020 election. 

Also in the newscast, Jourdan Bennett-Begaye has the latest numbers of positive COVID-19 tests in Indian Country.

The anchor and executive producer of the program is Patty Talahongva. 

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