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Native biologists speak out

On the Thursday edition of the ICT Newscast, a new series highlights the natural beauty of the Great Lakes. A Potawatomi biologist is one of this year’s MacArthur Fellows and the midterm elections are right around the corner
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The prestigious MacArthur Foundation has announced its class of fellows for 2022. One of those fellows is a Citizen Potawatomi Nation professor, writer and scientist. Robin Wall Kimmerer is the author of “Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.”

(Related: MacArthur 'Genius Grants' awarded to Indigenous filmmaker, botanist)

There’s a new three-part documentary series now available for streaming in the U.S. “Great Lakes Untamed” showcases the natural history of the world’s largest and most important watershed. Chevaun Toulouse is from Sagamok Anishnawbek where she spent her youth in the wetlands.

The 2022 midterm elections are two and a half weeks away. ICT and FNX “First Nations Experience” are proud to share that we will bring you a three-hour live newscast from an Indigenous perspective. Our newscast will be broadcast from San Bernardino, California and will be jam-packed with coverage. ICT’s editor-at-large Mark Trahant will co-anchor the event.

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  • Native Hawaiian advocates are speaking out about new developments affecting their lands and people, calling it a historic victory. Earlier this week, the Interior announced it will now require formal consultation with Native Hawaiian communities. This is the first time a process like this has ever happened in the agency’s history.
  • An Indigenous inmate on death row in California is getting one more chance at parole. Monache citizen Douglas Stankewitz is from the Big Sandy Rancheria. He’s been on San Quentin’s Death Row for 44 years. He was convicted of fatally shooting 21-year-old Theresa Kay Graybeal in a vacant lot in Fresno. Stankewitz will now get a resentencing hearing Jan. 20.
  • In New Mexico, a major electric car maker is partnering with a tribal nation, for a second time, to open up shop. Tesla has announced it will open a dealership on tribal lands by May 2023. The 35,000 square-foot facility will be located at Santa Ana Pueblo.
  • According to the Voting Rights Act, election offices are required to translate voting materials into different languages. That’s if more than 10,000, or at least five percent of voters are not proficient in English. Cronkite news reporter Alexia Stanbridge visited tribal nations in Arizona who are working on these efforts. 
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Today's newscast was created with work from:

Shirley Sneve, Ponca/Sicangu Lakota, is vice president of broadcasting for the ICT Newscast. Follow her on Twitter @rosebudshirley. She is based in Nebraska and Minnesota.

Aliyah Chavez, Kewa Pueblo, is the anchor of the ICT Newscast. On Twitter: @aliyahjchavez.

R. Vincent Moniz, Jr., NuÉta, is the senior producer of the ICT Newscast. Have a great story? Pitch it to vincent@ictnews.org.

McKenzie Allen-Charmley, Dena’ina Athabaskan, is a producer of the ICT Newscast. On Twitter: @mallencharmley.

Patty Talahongva, Hopi, works for ICT. Follow her on Twitter: @WiteSpider.

Maxwell Montour, Pottawatomi, is a newscast editor for the ICT Newscast. On Instagram: max.montour. Montour is based in Phoenix.

Kaitlin Onawa Boysel, Cherokee, is a producer/ reporter for ICT. On Instagram: @KaitlinBoysel.

Drea Yazzie, Diné, is a producer/editor for the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @quindreayazzie Yazzie is based in Phoenix.

Sierra Alvarez, Navajo, is an intern for the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @sierraealvarez.

Pacey Smith Garcia, Ute, is an intern for the ICT newscast. On Twitter: @paceyjournalist

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