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The Supreme Court of the United States decided there is no federal constitutional right to abortion care for women and people who birth in a 6-3 decision of Roe v. Wade Friday morning.

Access to abortion has already been difficult for Indigenous women and people who birth, due to the Hyde Amendment that banned the use of federal money for abortion care.

Many Indigenous people rely on Indian Health Services for their care and the Hyde Amendment deeply impacted Indigenous communities' access to abortion, forcing Indigenous people to drive hundreds of miles to access the care they needed. READ MOREPauly Denetclaw, ICT

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From lawmakers, advocates and everyday citizens, people are furious over the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and are organizing rallies across the country. Indigenous communities were no exception, ICT rounded up reactions from around the web.

Using tribal sovereignty to bypass state restrictions is an idea largely proposed by non-Native groups and is unlikely, according to an article published Wednesday by High Country News.

“Legal issues wouldn’t be the only barriers to providing abortion services on tribal land. Tribal councils would be unlikely to approve such clinics,” Charon Asetoyer said in the article. She’s the executive director of the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center on the Yankton Sioux tribal lands in South Dakota. READ MORE ICT

California’s 5th District Court of Appeal has ordered state Attorney General Rob Bonta to respond to an Indigenous man’s request for a new hearing that his attorneys believe could lead to his release from San Quentin Prison, where he has been incarcerated 44 years for a murder he says he did not commit.

Douglas “Chief” Stankewitz, a Monache man from Big Sandy Rancheria, filed a petition asking for an evidentiary hearing in January 2021 in Fresno County Superior Court, where he was convicted in 1978 for a carjacking/murder.

Judge Arlan L. Harrell, who was appointed to the Superior Court in 2006, has not ruled on the petition in the 17 months since it was filed, but instead has granted himself several extensions that have exceeded the time allowed under the California Rules of Court. READ MORERichard Arlin Walker, Special to ICT

The latest: An Indigenous designer is featured in The Met, a video game based on an Alaskan tale wins a prestigious award, and an art exhibition casts a spotlight on the Everglades

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FASHION: Indigenous designs exhibited at Metropolitan

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s current Costume Institute exhibition, “In America: A Lexicon of Fashion,” now features a stunning floor-length, beige-and-black dress designed by Jamie Okuma, Luiseño and Shoshone-Bannock.

Okuma, who is based on the La Jolla Indian Reservation in Pauma Valley, California, said she is “still in disbelief” that her work has been included in the exhibition, she told Vogue. READ MORE – Sandra Hale Schulman, Special to ICT

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Rebekah Dunlap is a certified nurse midwife. From the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior, she is determined to revitalize Ojibwe practices around childbirth, and a Bush Fellowship will help her accomplish that.

Emily Edenshaw is the president and CEO of the Alaska Native Heritage Center. She’s also a recipient of the "40 under 40" award from the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development. She relates the uniqueness of her culture.

WATCH:

Navajo Nation presidential hopefuls gathered at Twin Arrows Casino on June 21 to answer questions about how they would address issues affecting the Navajo economy.

“I think it’s at the forefront of people’s minds,” Change Labs Executive Director Heather Fleming said of the topic. Especially since the Navajo Nation has received funding from the American Rescue Plan, and how it is being disrupted among the tribe.

“I think people want to know what the plan is,” she added. “We’re coming out of a pandemic (and) a lot of small businesses are in a depressed state. What are we gonna do to rebuild our economy?” READ MORE Arizona Mirror

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  • Pollutants from far distances found in Bering Sea animals hunted by Indigenous people
  • Post-Roe, a $1M grant will provide more abortion access to Oregon and Idaho residents
  • Abortion havens on tribal lands are unlikely

We want your tips, but we also want your feedback. What should we be covering that we’re not? What are we getting wrong? Please let us know. dalton@ictnews.org.

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