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The number of Indigenous candidates who run for office continues to grow every cycle with 2018 being the year the nation saw the first Indigenous women go to Congress, Deb Haaland and Sharice Davids. It was the year Minnesota Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan became the first Indigenous woman elected to the highest statewide office in the country.

Two years later, a record number of Indigenous people ran for state and federal office. That 2020 cycle, Congress welcomed six Indigenous representatives to the U.S. House. In total 114 ran for public office and 72 were elected. The majority were Indigenous women at 67.

Here is the breakdown of Indigenous candidates this midterm election for the primary and general elections, according to ICT’s database. READ MORE Pauly Denetclaw, ICT

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From left to right, Justice Deborah Begay, state Rep. Jennifer Jermaine, state Sen. Victoria Steele and Justice Susie Nelson. These four, along with Sara Mae Williams (not pictured), will all be serving Justice of the Peace terms after the midterms in a historic first. (Photo courtesy, Victoria Steele)

In a historic first, seven Native American women will be sitting on the bench in Arizona after Election Day.

Five will be serving terms at the justice court level, joining U.S. District Judge Diane Humetewa, Hopi, and recently appointed Superior Court Judge Charlene Jackson, Diné, on the bench.

A Justice of the Peace oversees misdemeanor offenses, domestic violence cases, civil lawsuits where the amount in dispute is under $10,000, landlord and tenant controversies and a range of other civil and criminal traffic offenses. READ MORECarina Dominguez, ICT

On Sunday, most of the U.S. will ‘fall back’ and revert to standard time at 2:00 a.m.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine says there are things you can do to make the transition easier for yourself and your family. The academy called for the elimination of daylight savings time, citing chronic sleep loss.

Nineteen states are currently calling to get rid of the time change, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Daylight Saving Time will begin on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 a.m. – Carina Dominguez, ICT

November is Native American Heritage Month, a time to recognize the contributions of Native people in the United States and celebrate the diverse cultures, traditions and histories of Native Americans.

As the National Congress of American Indians explains, it is “an opportune time to educate the general public about tribes, to raise a general awareness about the unique challenges Native people have faced both historically and in the present.”

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While some form of recognition has occurred since the early 1900s, it was not until 1990 that President George H.W. Bush approved a joint resolution that designated November 1990 as “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Every president since then has signed similar proclamations. READ MORE Noel Lyn Smith, ICT

Chum salmon swimming upriver NOAA Fisheries

Salmon populations on the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers have plummeted to record lows and fisheries managers shut down most or all of the fishing on the rivers last summer.

At the Alaska Federation of Natives convention in October delegates discussed possible solutions moving forward.

Brian Ridley, Athabaskan, is chief/chairman of the Tanana Chiefs Conference, the regional nonprofit for Interior Alaska. READ MOREJoaqlin Estus, ICT

Jhane Myers knew what she wanted to achieve with the hit film, “Prey.” She wanted a film about a strong, Indigenous woman with an all-Native cast and crew.

She got that and more — a popular prequel to the “Predator” series that hit highs in the film industry no one could have predicted. The movie, with a version in the Comanche language, broke Hulu records for a new film or series. READ MOREAlex Jacobs, Special to ICT

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On the weekend edition of the ICT Newscast, land back in Louisiana, artists gather in Rapid City, South Dakota, and the 'Singing Psychologist.' Plus, a look at the Alaska Federation of Natives meeting.

WATCH:

Not only can the urban Native vote significantly make a difference in elections, they can bring in Indigenous elected officials to the table.

“The Native Americans who are having an opportunity to step up and get into public service really are in the city of Albuquerque, are urban Natives. This is really where we have the opportunity to have a good bang for our buck,” Austin Weahkee, political director for New Mexico Native Vote, said.

Patricia Roybal Caballero, Piro Manso Tiwa, and Charlotte Little, San Felipe Pueblo, are both running for positions in the state House in Bernalillo County, which is New Mexico’s most populous county and includes Albuquerque. Its Native American and Alaska Native population is about 38,000. READ MORE Kalle Benallie, ICT

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