The Latest: Tuesday protests in D.C. less tense

The Associated Press

Updated: A look at developments in the U.S. and elsewhere following George Floyd's death

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The protest in the nation's capital on Tuesday night had less tension than the previous nights' demonstrations. 

The crowd in Lafayette Park near the White House was peaceful, polite even, as they protested the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minnesota.

Instead of the spray-painted tags, the protesters Tuesday favored colorful children's street chalk, writing Black Lives Matter slogans on the asphalt in front of St. John's Church.

Protesters chanted and talked among themselves, most wearing masks, but not social distancing in the age of COVID-19. One protester, Mati Yiheyis, a 21-year-old college student at the University of Virginia, speculated that fears of coronavirus kept many older people away.

When one protester climbed a lamp post and removed a street sign he was roundly booed by others. "It's not what we're about," said protester George "T.J." Pierce of Washington.

The crowd started thinning out on its own after 8 p.m., an hour after a curfew went into place, although a core group of several hundred remained at the fence, chanting at the line of police and soldiers in riot gear on the other side.

On Monday, law enforcement officers on foot and horseback aggressively drove protesters away from Lafayette Park, clearing the way for President Donald Trump to do a photo op at St. John's Church, known as the church of presidents. On Tuesday, pastors at the church prayed with demonstrators and handed out water bottles.

___

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Park Police denied using tear gas to disperse a crowd of protesters outside the White House on Monday night, saying officers instead used smoke canisters and pepper balls to aggressively push back the demonstrators.

Protesters scrambled as smoke filled the streets and AP journalists witnessed people reacting to their eyes and throats becoming irritated. Journalists covering the protest reported the crowd was largely peaceful at the time; the Park Police said they were responding to protesters throwing items, including bricks and frozen water bottles at law enforcement.

Justice Department officials offered a different explanation, saying officers were carrying out Attorney General William Barr's order to expand the security perimeter outside the White House.

Officers repelled the crowd nearly 30 minutes ahead of a 7 p.m. curfew in Washington. Shortly after the crowd was pushed back, President Donald Trump walked through the park where they had gathered for a photo opportunity at a nearby church.

___

DALLAS — Former President George W. Bush criticized any effort to squelch protests of George Floyd's death while in Minneapolis police custody.

In a statement issued Tuesday by his office in Dallas, the former Republican president said he and wife Laura Bush "are anguished by the brutal suffocation of George Floyd and disturbed by the injustice and fear that suffocate our country."

Bush did not refer specifically toward President Donald Trump, but he called the harassment and threats toward African American protesters "a shocking failure."

"It is a strength when protesters, protected by responsible law enforcement, march for a better future. ... Those who set out to silence those voices do not understand the meaning of America — or how it becomes a better place," he said.

___

MINNEAPOLIS — The mother of George Floyd's 6-year-old daughter, Gianna, said Tuesday that she wanted the world to know that her little girl lost a good father who would never get to see his daughter grow up.

"I want everybody to know that this is what those officers took. At the end of the day, they get to go home and be with their families," Roxie Washington said during a Minneapolis news conference with her young daughter at her side. "I'm here for my baby and I'm here for George because I want justice for him. I want justice for him because he was good. No matter what anybody thinks, he was good."

Floyd died on Memorial Day after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into the black man's neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air.

___

SEATTLE — Mayor Jenny Durkan addressed a large crowd protesting George Floyd's death in Minneapolis, telling them their "voices holding me accountable are important."

Tuesday was the fifth day of protests in the Northwest's largest city over the death of Floyd in police custody. Monday's protests were largely peaceful but turned chaotic as officers dispersed the crowd at night using tear gas and flash-bang devices. Authorities said demonstrators threw fireworks and tried to storm a barricade, but citizen video showed the chaos began when an officer grabbed a pink umbrella that a demonstrator was holding just across a barricade.

Standing next to the city's police chief at the downtown Emergency Operations Center, Durkan said she supported the crowd's right to rally against injustice.

"We want you to march, we want you to raise your voices, we want you to continue on your path of justice," Durkan said over a microphone as the crowd listened, mostly in silence. "But we need you, please, to do it peacefully." The mayor, a former U.S. attorney, then took questions from some in the crowd.

___

ST. PAUL, MINN. — Thousands of protesters gathered on the front lawn of the Minnesota Capitol as part of a youth protest for George Floyd on Tuesday afternoon.

The crowd listened to speakers and periodically chanted slogans like, "Say his name: George Floyd."

William Ray, 22, said his protest was about more than just George Floyd's death last week. His grandparents were civil rights activists in the 60s and also members of the Black Panther Party.

"I grew up with an understanding of what needs to be done, growing up with them and seeing the change that they brought to the community. ... America was built off of slaves -- my ancestors. A lot of the systems that were in place then are still here," he said.

Christine Ohenzuwa, 19, of Blaine, Minnesota, said she's felt disheartened by the "endless cascade of hashtags of black people dying." Of the unrest that has gripped cities across the nation, she said, "there's always going to be a breaking point."

"It's really painful to see what's going on, but it's also really important to understand that it's connected to a system of racial violence," she said.

___

WASHINGTON — A former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff says he was "sickened" to see National Guard troops and other security personnel forcibly clear protesters from a square near the White House to facilitate President Donald Trump's walk to a nearby church to pose for photographers.

Calling the visit Monday a "stunt," Mike Mullen, a retired Navy admiral who headed the military from 2007 to 2011, wrote in The Atlantic on Tuesday it laid bare what he called Trump's "disdain" for the rights of peaceful protesters. He said it also risked further politicizing the military.

Mullen cautioned against an overly aggressive use of the military to restrain the sometimes-violent protests around the country. He said he has confidence in the professionalism of the troops but worries about the soundness of the orders they would be given by Trump.

___

MIAMI — A demonstration in Miami grew to about 400 people as protesters marched from a courthouse to a historically black neighborhood north of downtown.

Demonstrators sat on one knee during several stops to listen to organizers shouting instructions that they were to remain peaceful and hydrated in the 80-degree weather. They shouted "No justice, no peace, no racist police" as more than 30 officers followed the group a few blocks behind wearing body armor.

Twenty-two-year-old Trinity Auberry arrived at the demonstration with four other friends. It was the first time protesting for the young black model who said the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis is not isolated and cases of "police brutality" are also common in Florida.

___

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The West Virginia National Guard is pursuing disciplinary action against a guardsman who posted on social media that he would shoot at people protesting the death of George Floyd, officials said Tuesday.

The guardsman, Noah Garcelon, has already resigned his position as an officer with the Winfield Police Department after making the comments. In a series of now-deleted posts, Garcelon wrote that he would "start firing live rounds" at protesters and "see how many I can run over before my car breaks down."

Maj. Gen. James Hoyer, who leads the state's National Guard, said officials will be taking the appropriate disciplinary action related to Garcelon and any others "who make inflammatory comments related to protests going on across the nation."

Winfield Police Department Chief Ron Arthur said Garcelon acknowledged that he made the comments and stressed that he wasn't a racist before resigning.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice, a Republican, has urged people to remain peaceful but said he would not hesitate to call in the National Guard if demonstrations in the state became violent.

___

COLUMBIA, S.C. — About 100 people gathered in front of the state capitol building in downtown Columbia, South Carolina, on Tuesday afternoon as medics passed out water bottles and snacks and volunteers passed out voter registration forms.

Participants raised their fists in unison as passing commuters showed their solidarity with honks and waves.

An outreach minister emphasized the need to sustain demonstrations past the initial events over the weekend and also urged a peaceful nature in the afternoon's demonstrations. Minister Danielle Ford told the crowd, "they're waiting on us to give up, they're waiting on us to get tired, they're waiting on us to give in. We need you out here."

A 21-year-old college student said she was protesting for justice for George Floyd as well as Joshua Ruffin, a 17-year-old shot to death by a Columbia police officer after a foot chase in April.

___

HOUSTON -- Houston rappers Bun B and Trae Tha Truth organized a march on Tuesday and told the crowd it would be peaceful.

After asking the crowd of several thousand to look for anybody who could cause trouble, Bun B then led them on a chant. He said "What's his name?" and the crowd replied, "George Floyd."

The crowd later got down on one knee and was silent for 30 seconds.

Among those participating was a group of about 60 people on horseback from a riding club in Houston.

___

 LOS ANGELES -- Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore said Tuesday more than 2,700 people have been arrested since protests and violence began in the nation's second-largest city.

The chief told the city Police Commission that about 2,500 of those arrests were for failure to disperse or curfew violations. The remainder were for crimes including burglary, looting, assaults on police officers and other violence.

The chief gave the figures during a report to the Police Department's civilian oversight board. Several new demonstrations in Los Angeles on Tuesday over the death of George Floyd have remained peaceful.

___

PARIS — Riot officers have fired tear gas as scattered protesters threw projectiles and set fires during an unauthorized demonstration against police violence and racial injustice.

Several thousand people had previously rallied peacefully for two hours Tuesday around the main Paris courthouse in homage to George Floyd and to Adama Traore, a French black man who died in police custody.

Police had banned the protest because of coronavirus restrictions that forbid any gathering of more than 10 people.

As the demonstration wound down, police fired tear gas and protesters could be seen throwing projectiles. Two small fires broke out.

Tensions also erupted at a related protest Tuesday in the southern city of Marseille.

___

CHICAGO -- Authorities in a Chicago suburb where two people were fatally shot in unrest following George Floyd's death are issuing fresh safety precautions Tuesday.

Cicero officials cautioned residents to "stay home and stay off the streets" a day after violence and destruction erupted in the town of about 84,000 west of Chicago. Police say most of Monday's chaos stemmed from residents trying to defend businesses. Roughly 60 people were arrested, mostly for burglary and weapons violations.

Two men in their 20s were fatally shot around 6 p.m. in separate incidents related to the violent clashes.

___

TRENTON, N.J. — Citing George Floyd's death, New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said Tuesday the state will update its guidelines governing the use of force by police for the first time in two decades and will move to require a statewide licensing program for all officers.

At least 43 other states require some licensing requirement for officers, Grewal said, adding he wants to bring law enforcement in line with other professions that require licensing.

The announcements also include a pilot program in a handful of cities across the state to conduct training programs aimed at promoting safe interactions between police and communities and the implementation of a statewide database to document when police use force, Grewal said.

___

MINNEAPOLIS — The state of Minnesota has filed a civil rights charge against the Minneapolis Police Department in the wake of George Floyd's death.

The state says it will investigate the department's policies and practices over the last 10 years to determine whether it has engaged in "systemic" discrimination against people of color. The complaint comes from the state Department of Human Rights, which enforces the state's human rights act. It targets a police department that has faced decades of allegations of brutality and other discrimination against African-Americans and other minorities including within the department itself.

Critics say the department has a culture that resists change and the department has come under fresh criticism after Floyd died after a white officer knelt on his neck and ignored his cries of "I can't breathe" until Floyd eventually stopped moving.

___

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William Barr ordered law enforcement officials to clear Lafayette Park and push back the perimeter around the White House when he arrived there Monday evening, leading to police using tear gas to disperse protesters.

A person familiar with the matter tells The Associated Press that Barr expected the perimeter to have been extended much earlier Monday. The person could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke to AP on condition of anonymity.

The person said officials had met that morning and decided the perimeter had to be moved by at least one full block after multiple fires were set in the park the night before. They said that was expected to happen by Monday afternoon.

The person said Barr was surprised it hadn't been done when he arrived in the early evening and directed action to be taken. They said he assumed police would use "typical crowd control measures" against protesters who resisted commands to clear the area.

___

MINNEAPOLIS — Prosecutors are delaying the case against a man who drove his semitrailer into a crowd of protesters on a closed Minneapolis freeway.

The 35-year-old man drove his tanker truck into the midst of thousands of people who had gathered on Interstate 35W near downtown Minneapolis on Sunday. Authorities said it appeared no one was hurt and the man was arrested.

Gov. Tim Walz said the man became confused and somehow got on the freeway before traffic officials closed it.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced Tuesday that the case against the man has been deferred pending further investigation and he'll be released from jail. Freeman said investigators are working to gather additional information to help in making a charging decision.

___

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump ordered military aircraft to fly above the nation's capital Monday night as a "show of force" against demonstrators protesting the death of George Floyd, according to two Department of Defense officials.

Show-of-force missions are designed to intimidate and, in combat zones, warn opposing forces of potential military action if provoked. The officials, who insisted on anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss ongoing operations publicly, did not say how many or what type of aircraft had been mobilized.

Videos and photographs posted on social media showed helicopters flying low over buildings and hovering just above groups who were on the street despite a district-wide curfew.

On Tuesday, roughly 700 members of the Army's 82nd Airborne Division had arrived at two military bases near Washington. Another 1,400 soldiers are ready to be mobilized within an hour, the two Pentagon officials said. The soldiers are armed and have riot gear as well as bayonets.

The officials said the mission has been named "Operation Themis." In Greek mythology, Themis was a titaness of divine law and order, whose symbols are the scales of justice.

- Reporting by James LaPorta

AP Logo little
Comments

News

FEATURED
COMMUNITY