Pipeline gets green light from Canadian court

Supreme Court of Canada (Creative Commons photo)

The Associated Press

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government approved Trans Mountain in 2016 and was so determined to see it built that it bought the pipeline

Rob Gillies

Associated Press

TORONTO — The Supreme Court of Canada on Thursday dismissed an appeal from British Columbia First Nations against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion that would nearly triple the flow of oil from the Alberta oil sands to the Pacific Coast

The court dismissed the appeal from the Squamish Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, the Ts'elxweyeqw Tribes and Coldwater Indian Band, effectively ending the years long legal battle over the project. 

The pipeline would end at a terminal outside Vancouver, resulting in a sevenfold increase in the number of tankers in the shared waters between Canada and Washington state.

Some First Nations successfully halted federal approval of the project in 2018 when the Federal Court of Appeal said Ottawa had failed to properly consult affected First Nations, which argued that the project would damage their lands and waters.

Tsleil-Waututh Chief Leah George-Wilson and Syeta'xtn of the Squamish Nation will be hosting a virtual news conference later Thursday.

But in February the same court dismissed another challenge by the same groups against the government's June 2019 decision to approve the project a second time after another round of Indigenous consultation.

As usual, the Supreme Court gave no reasons for Thursday's ruling.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government approved Trans Mountain in 2016 and was so determined to see it built that it bought the pipeline. 

It still faces stiff environmental opposition from British Columbia's provincial government but construction is underway. Natural Resource Minister Seamus O'Regan said consultations will continue as construction continues. 

"To those who are disappointed with today's SCC decision — we see and hear you," O'Regan said in a statement. "The Government of Canada is committed to a renewed relationship with Indigenous people and understands that consultations on major projects have a critical role in building that renewed relationship."

The pipeline would allow Canada to diversify oil markets and vastly increase exports to Asia, where it could command a higher price. About 99 percent of Canada's exports now go to refiners in the U.S., where limits on pipeline and refinery capacity mean Canadian oil sells at a discount.

Comments (5)
No. 1-3
Gregolio55
Gregolio55

Dirty oil brings dirty politics . Who gives them the right to yet poison another stretch of land? Do the ones making these terrible decisions have to live with a threat of pollution from spills and contamination of water sources . This oil is tainted blood you will spill over mother Earth

Gall
Gall

Trudeau is one of those warm and fuzzy racist neoliberal scum like Basement Biden.

Vote Mark Charles 2020!

2 Replies

caniscandida
caniscandida

Justin Trudeau has indeed made a number of bad calls during his life, some of them racist. And he perhaps hopes too easily that his being "warm and fuzzy" will get him forgiven. He doesn't deserve forgiveness, if he refuses to discontinue his government's aiding and abetting Canada's deadly fossil fuels industry.

Whether Joe Biden deserves to be called "racist neoliberal scum" I doubt. And as much as I admire Mark Charles and wish him well, voting for Biden is our only hope of preventing a return of the abominable Donald Trump.

Gall
Gall

Biden is even worse than Trump.

Proposing jumping into the fire to escape frying pan doesn’t work for me.

Johasen
Johasen

https://www/plumbingorangecountyca.com there is more to this


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