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Associated Press

A man who was shot at a Rapid City hotel last month has died of his injuries, according to police.

Myron Pourier, 19, of Porcupine was shot March 19 at the Grand Gateway Hotel and died Sunday at a hospital. His alleged assailant is being held on $1 million cash bond at the Pennington County Jail.

He is charged with aggravated assault and committing a felony while armed. Chief Deputy State's Attorney Lara Roetzel says her office will reconsider charges in the wake of Pourier's death.

(Previous: Lawsuit filed against hotel wanting to ban Native people)

Rapid City police officers were dispatched to the hotel about 4:30 a.m. that Saturday after a report of a disturbance. Once on scene, they were notified a gun had been fired in one of the rooms. Police then found Pourier and rendered first aid.

After interviews with witnesses, the suspect was arrested.

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Following the shooting, one of the hotel's owners said on social media that Native Americans would be banned from the hotel property. Rapid City police spokesman Brendyn Medina had said both the victim and the shooting suspect are Native. The post drew strong reactions from tribal leaders and politicians.

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Chairman Harold Frazier called it racist and discriminatory, and demanded an apology.

“It is foolish to attack a race of people and not all of the issues affecting the society in which we live. This includes racism," Frazier said in a statement. ”The members of the Great Sioux Nation who visit our sacred Black Hills are often subject to this kind of behavior. Those members that choose to live on our treaty territory are often treated as a problem, no matter how we choose to live."

NDN Collective, an Indigenous-led organization, filed a federal class action civil rights lawsuit against the hotel, its owner and its parent company.

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