HUD awards near $200 million for affordable housing in Native communities

Vincent Schilling

Hunter Kurtz, assistant secretary for public and Indian housing: ‘That's why I get up every morning and do this’

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Tuesday grants of nearly $200 million to 52 tribes and tribal housing programs across the country for new construction.

The grants will be awarded through HUD’s Indian Housing Block Grant program to help construct approximately 1,200 new housing units for low-income families living on Indian reservations or in other Indian areas, and spur economic opportunities in distressed communities to help our neediest families.

Tribal partners are maximizing this investment by leveraging an estimated $90 million dollars in additional resources, according to HUD’s communications department.

Hunter Kurtz, assistant secretary for public and Indian housing, said the department works to ‘to ensure safe, decent, and affordable housing for the general public and homes in Indian Country and works to create opportunities for residents' self-sufficiency and economic independence — said giving additional funding to 52 tribes across the country “feels great.”

“I've spent most of my professional career in the affordable housing industry, and to be able to give funds through this new program, which we estimated about 1,200 new, and affordable housing units. That's really exciting,” said Kurtz.

Kurtz said the HUD’s Indian Housing Block Grant program was a new competitive program, “unlike the standard Indian housing block grant program.” An approximate 200 tribes applied and HUD was able to fund the 52 tribes.

The grants will be used for rehabilitation and the development of new and affordable housing in Indian Country.

Hunter Kurtz, Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing
Hunter Kurtz, Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing.

“We're excited to see how the funds are used and what, what they're used for. But you know, this specific program is brand new for us as well.”

Kurtz said that inasmuch as it is great to talk about monetary numbers and grants, he also felt enthusiastic able helping people live in better homes as well as support the efforts of jobs and other income-providing opportunities surrounding these grant programs.

“I love this job. I like to say that this is the best job I've ever had as the assistant secretary for public and Indian housing. We're helping over three and a half million families every day through our various programs. And the fact that I can make a difference in someone's life, that's why I work in this industry. It’s the high you get from helping somebody in that situation.”

“It's great to talk about the numbers, but I'm really excited to get a chance to go out and see one of these first units and, and meet the folks to see how it changes their life and it makes their life better,” said Kurtz.

“That's why I get up every morning and do this.”

HUD Secretary Ben Carson posted a video announcement on HUD’s YouTube channel regarding the Indian Housing Block Grant competitive program.

Dr. Ben Carson - Indian Housing Block Grant Competitive Program 

Video transcript

Hi, I’m Secretary Ben Carson, and today, I have the privilege of sharing some exciting news for Native American communities across America.

It is no secret there are serious housing issues in Indian Country and more needs to be done. That’s why today, I’m pleased to announce an award of nearly $200 million in competitive Indian Housing Block Grants to 52 Native American tribes across the nation.

These awards will be used to construct 1,200 new housing units in 16 states for low-income American Indian and Alaskan Native families. These grants will be used to develop new affordable housing, rehabilitate existing housing units, upgrade infrastructure, and more.

I’m particularly proud that these funds will also leverage an estimated 90 million dollars in additional resources to equip Tribes with much-needed funding.

Here at HUD, we are excited for this new opportunity to better serve Native American communities through our government-to-government relationship with the Tribes. I look forward to seeing the meaningful work that Tribes will accomplish through this much-needed investment.

Thank You.

The following 52 Tribes and TDHEs received grants: 

Alaska 

Aleut Community of St. Paul Tribal Government - $2,481,226

Aleutian Housing Authority - $2,530,496

Cook Inlet Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Copper River Basin -  $5,000,000

Gwichyaa Zhee Tribal Government (Native Village of Fort Yukon) - $1,520,000

Arizona

Tohono O'odham Ki_Ki Housing Association $5,000,000

White Mountain Apache Housing Authority $5,000,000

California

All Mission Indian Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria - $1,474,673

Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians - $4,998,446

Enterprise Rancheria Indian Housing Authority - $4,953,094

Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel - $4,624,017

North Fork Rancheria Indian Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Ramona Band of Cahuilla - $2,540,000

Tolowa Dee-ni' Nation $5,000,000

Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla $3,700,000

Colorado

Southern Ute Indiana Housing Authority - $1,122,000

Louisiana

Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana - $3,860,725

Michigan

Bay Mills Indian Community - $1,823,713

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan - $3,967,260

Sault Tribe Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Minnesota

Lower Sioux Indian Housing Authority - $1,597,125

Red Lake Reservation Housing Authority - $2,250,000

Mississippi

Choctaw Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Montana

Chippewa Cree - $4,945,214

Fort Peck Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Salish & Kootenai Housing Authority - $3,912,500

Nebraska

Northern Ponca Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Nevada

Winnemucca Indian Colony $825,093

Zuni Housing Authority $5,000,000

New Mexico

Jicarilla Apache Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Mescalero Apache Tribe Housing Department - $4,000,000

Nambe Pueblo Housing Entity - $3,025,760

Ohkay Owingeh Housing Authority - $5,000,000

San Felipe Pueblo Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Santo Domingo Tribal Housing Authority $4,515,723

Tamaya Housing, Inc $4,824,139

New York 

Akwesasne Housing Authority - $4,787,173

Oklahoma

Chickasaw Nation - $5,000,000

Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma - $3,000,000

Thlopthlocco Tribal Town - $2,818,428

Wyandotte Nation - $1,385,745

Oregon

Coquille Indian Housing Authority - $1,274,985

Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians - $3,775,933

Texas

Ysleta del Sur Pueblo - $3,662,584

Washington

Colville Indian Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Kalispel Indian Community of the Kalispel Reservation - $1,000,000

Muckleshoot Indian Tribe dba Muckleshoot Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Swinomish Housing Authority - $1,375,708

Yakama Nation Housing Authority - $5,000,000

Wisconsin

Red Cliff Chippewa Housing Authority - $4,845,656

Wyoming 

Northern Arapaho Housing Authority Consolidated - $4,975,366

TOTAL $197,392,782 

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Follow Indian Country Today’s associate editor Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) on Twitter - @VinceSchilling and Instagram - @VinceSchilling

Email - vschilling@indiancountrytoday.com

Comments (2)
No. 1-2
MontanaMan
MontanaMan

That’s $167,000 per house.

Chipgirl
Chipgirl

What happen to us in North Dakota?


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