Indian Country Today

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Muscogee (Creek) Nation offering vaccines to Oklahoma adults

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Muscogee (Creek) Nation announced Friday that it plans to offer 4,000 first-dose vaccines to any adult Oklahoman, even non-tribal citizens.

The Okmulgee-based tribe says it will host a drive-through vaccination event on March 26-27 at Tulsa’s Expo Square. Oklahoma-based tribes have been receiving separate allocations of vaccines from the federal government, and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation is the latest to offer vaccines to non-tribal citizens.

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Last musher brings dogs over Alaska’s Iditarod finish line

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The final musher has crossed the finish line in this year’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, nearly three days after the winner reached the finish line near the small Alaska community of Willow.

Victoria Hardwick finished the race at 12:22 a.m. Thursday, claiming the race’s Red Lantern Award.

The lantern is an Alaska tradition, awarded annually to the competition’s last place finisher. Race officials say the award honors the final musher’s perseverance in not giving up.

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Kiowa elder bonds with young actress

“I can look you in the eye and just about tell sincerity in somebody,” said Dorothy WhiteHorse DeLaune, who built an enduring friendship with a then-10-year-old German actress on a New Mexico movie set.

“I knew she was a special child, there was nothing snobby or anything,” said WhiteHorse, 88. “If she found me on the set, she’d come over and get her little chair and sit with me.”

The first time WhiteHorse met Helena Zengel, she gave the child star a beaded cross. The second time, WhiteHorse gave her a little doll. Zengel was so touched by the gifts that she couldn’t put them down, WhiteHorse said.

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Navajo Nation nears 30K COVID-19 cases since pandemic began

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. (AP) — The Navajo Nation on Thursday reported six more deaths and 18 new cases of COVID-19 as the total number of cases approaches the 30,000 mark since the pandemic began.

The latest numbers pushed the tribe’s pandemic total to 29,987 confirmed cases and 1,228 known deaths.

“Now is not the time to go on vacation or to hold large in-person gatherings... We cannot let another surge occur here on the Navajo Nation,” President Jonathan Nez said

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