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Happy first day of March! A lot of news out there. Thanks for stopping by Indian Country Today’s digital platform.

Each day we do our best to gather the latest news for you. 

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A new United Nations report published in Berlin Monday could not be more clear: Climate change is already “causing dangerous and widespread disruption in nature and affecting the lives of billions of people around the world.”

Many tribal and Arctic communities are first in line. Or as the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says: “People and ecosystems least able to cope are being hardest hit.”

A statement released by the Indigenous Environmental Network says the UN report demonstrates that “our addiction to fossil fuels has caused climate warming at a rate not seen in at least the past 2000 years.” This information “is not news for Indigenous peoples for this report merely reinforces what Indigenous peoples have been saying all along.” READ MOREMark Trahant, Indian Country Today

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OKLAHOMA CITY — Oklahoma GOP U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin, Cherokee Nation, said he will run for the U.S. Senate seat that is coming open after Sen. Jim Inhofe’s surprise announcement that he’s retiring before his term is up.

Mullin said in a video message Saturday that he planned to enter the race, as expected political shake-ups begin.

“I’m just going to tell you the way it is. I’m in,” he said in the video, which appeared to be recorded as he was driving. “I’m not one to back away from a fight. In fact, I believe 100% if you’re going to get in a fight, you win it. So we’re in it to win it.” READ MOREAssociated Press

Indian Health Service Rapid City Service Unit will be managed by the Oyate Health Center, a tribally-managed clinic in South Dakota operated by the Great Plains Tribal Leaders Health Board.

The transfer happened on Feb. 26, according to an IHS news release.

“We welcome this opportunity to participate in the transition from federal to tribal program operations on behalf of IHS beneficiaries in the Rapid City Area.” said IHS Acting Deputy Director Elizabeth Fowler. “We are confident the Oyate Health Center will continue to provide excellent health care to patients throughout the Great Plains Area.” READ MORE. Indian Country Today

In the art world, being included in the Whitney Biennial is a big, prestigious deal.

Opened in 1932 by the museum’s founder, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, it's the longest-running exhibition of its kind that charts trends and artistic developments in the United States.

The exhibition takes place in the Whitney Museum of American Art on the Hudson River in Manhattan, in one of the most famous and architecturally beautiful museums in the country. READ MORE. – Sandra Hale Schulman, Special to Indian Country Today

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On Tuesday's ICT Newscast, the Indian Child Welfare Act has the potential to be overturned by the Supreme Court and a new climate report says global warming is about to get much worse. Plus, we visited Cherokee actress Sheri Foster Blake.

Watch:

John Denver music and log cabin floor plans.

Those two escapes were among Benjamin Quanah Parker’s go-to ways to relieve stress and decompress from the rigors of completing a Ph.D. in mathematical sciences.

Now, with a doctorate in hand and a good job, he can start building a future in which that log cabin becomes more of a reality than a daydream.

Parker, a citizen of the Squaxin Island Tribe in Washington and also Turtle Mountain Ojibwe, Cree, Shoshone-Bannock, successfully defended his dissertation — entitled “Eigenvalue Problems for Optical Fibers and Uncertainty Quantification” — in December to become the first Native American to earn a Ph.D. in mathematical sciences from Portland State University, joining a small but growing group of Indigenous mathematicians with doctorates in the U.S. READ MORE. Chris Aadland, Underscore News and Indian Country Today

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  • First Native American to lead National Endowment for the Humanities says the agency can strengthen democracy

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