Yá'át'ééh, relatives.

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Celebrities urge President Biden to stop Line 3

A letter signed by over 200 celebrities, Democratic donors, Indigenous environmental activists and allies urging President Biden to shut down construction of Enbridge Line 3 was delivered to the White House on Wednesday.

Actor Mark Ruffalo moderated a press call about the letter in which he and others urged the Biden administration to follow through with its promises to reduce the country’s reliance on fossil fuel, address climate change and support Indigenous rights.

Winona LaDuke reminded Biden that Indigenous voters played a key role in his successful election. “I drove people to the polls for you, Joe; many were first time voters,” she said during the call. LaDuke, a citizen of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe, is executive director of Honor the Earth, an Indigenous environmental activist group based in Minnesota.

Ruffalo said, “I call upon the President and the Army Corps of Engineers to suspend and thoroughly review the permit for the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline, a massive project that would not only intensify the climate crisis but violates the treaty rights of tribal nations.”

In a June 24 court filing, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urged a federal judge to deny a request by pipeline opponents to reverse its permit supporting construction of the pipeline, effectively supporting a Trump era decision.

The letter highlights the negative impacts of the pipeline on the rights and lifeways of Indigenous people, including endangering wild rice habitat and cultural resources.

“The time to deliver on the promise of a safe climate and good jobs in a clean energy-powered economy is the next 8 years. But the time-the only time to keep hope alive by preventing fossil fuel commitments that would foreclose that bright prospect is right now,” the letter read.

It was signed by Mark Ruffalo, Leonardo DiCaprio, Katy Perry, Joaquin Phoenix, Danny Glover, Jane Fonda, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Buffy Sainte-Marie and others.

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Tribes threaten to sue over transmission corridor

MONTREAL (AP) — Some tribes in Canada are threatening to sue to stop construction on the Canadian side of the border on a transmission corridor that aims to provide hydropower to the New England power grid.

The New England Clean Energy Connect calls for a 145-mile (233-kilometer) transmission line in Maine to bring electricity produced by Hydro-Quebec to the New England grid. But it also requires 64 miles (103 kilometers) of new transmission lines in Quebec.

If the plan isn’t scuttled, then the First Nations intend to sue in provincial court. The five tribes, comprised of the Anishnabeg, Atikamekw and Innu nations, represent about 7,000 people, Maine Public reported.

The Canadian transmission line would not cross tribal land, but the First Nations contend that more than a third of the electricity will be produced from dams on land the tribes never ceded to the Canadian government… READ more.

Navajo chef releasing cookbook

A Navajo cook from New Mexico has a new book of recipes that celebrate modern Native cuisine.

Freddie Bitsoie, Navajo, has a cookbook titled, "New Native Kitchen: Celebrating Modern Recipes of the American Indian."

Bitsoie's book is set to be released in October, according to KOB-TV.

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Australia's Olympic team features 16 Indigenous athletes

Sixteen Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander athletes will be competing across 11 sports in this month's Tokyo Olympics.

It's the most First Nations athletes ever to be selected for an Australian Olympics team. See list of athletes here.

ASU professor retires after years of advocating for Native communities

James Riding In, Pawnee Nation, retired in May as interim director and associate professor of the American Indian Studies program at Arizona State University. He dedicated more than 30 years to the university.

Riding In was a co-founder of ASU's American Indian Studies program, according to a news release.

"He has been a popular professor, known for his lively lectures, stories of the early years of American Indian activism and innovative teaching style,” said Stephanie Fitzgerald, associate professor and director of the American Indian Studies program. “Dr. Riding In was instrumental in building the American Indian Studies program into the robust program we know today. We are indebted to his vision and commitment to American Indian Studies.”

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Top elected officials on Hopi seek second term

KYKOTSMOVI, Ariz. (AP) — The top two elected officials on Hopi are seeking another term in office.

The Hopi Election Board recently certified the candidates for the election scheduled later this year. Chairman Tim Nuvangyaoma and Vice Chairman Clark Tenakhongva are running for a second consecutive four-year term.

Nuvangyaoma is among four seeking the chairman’s post. He’ll face David Norton Talayumptewa, a member of the Tribal Council and former U.S. Bureau of Indian Education official, whom he beat in the 2017 general election.

Former Vice Chairman Alfred Lomaquahu Jr. and Andrew Qumyintewa also are running for chairman. Hopis will narrow the list to two in the September primary election.

The Hopi reservation in northeastern Arizona is completely surrounded by the much-larger Navajo Nation with its villages situated among three mesas. The Hopi Tribe has more than 14,600 enrolled citizens, not all of whom live on the reservation, according to the Hopi Enrollment Office ... READ more.

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