Indian Country Today

A year ago Indian Country Today launched the first ever election night broadcast. Working with our partners FNX: First Nations Experience and Native Voice One, we brought together some forty Native journalists and reported the national election live.

We heard from a lot of people who watched the events unfold on cable, on the Internet, and at election watch parties.

As we wrote last year: “Across the scope of the evening, viewers watched as history-making candidates won their elections. Notably, the announcement of the first two Native women to win a Congressional bid — Deb Haaland, and Sharice Davids — highlighted the evening.”

We also predicted … that there will be a next time.

Over the past year we have been working toward that end. We are building a news operation to better cover the 2020 election and the impact of Native American voters.

We need your help to make it so.

Indian Country Today’s fall membership drive begins on our platform today. The idea is to make it as easy as possible to support our journalism.

There are no subscriptions and our content is free. But we do want your support. Our budget calls for $100,000 in revenue from our readers.

Here is how you can help.

Supporters: Any amount.

We would list members, legacy, and circle names in our masthead (in the about section)

Benefits: Stickers, buttons

Members: $100 or $10 a month.

Benefits:

Benefits: Stickers, buttons

Monthly digest

Socks (until gone)

Legacy member: $1,000 or $100 a month.

Benefits: Stickers, buttons

Monthly digest

Indian Country Today socks and other gifts

Invitation to sit in on a Daily Huddle

Access to the Daily Note from the editor

The Phoenix 100: $5,000 or more.

Benefits: Stickers, buttons

Monthly digest

Indian Country Today socks and other gifts

Invitation to sit in on a Daily Huddle

Access to the Daily Note from the editor

Indian Country Today speakers' bureau

Elias Boudinot was the first editor of a tribal newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix. He called the medium “a spacious channel.” That’s our goal creating an extraordinary network for Indigenous thought. The Phoenix 100 commemorates that history — as well as our new home in Phoenix at the Cronkite School.

“We cannot do this without our readers’ support,” said Mark Trahant, editor of Indian Country Today. “And even those who can donate can help us by spreading the word via social media. In the end, though, this is not about the money. It’s about the journalism. And reader support is what makes that happen.”

Indian Country Today, now a not-for-profit limited liability corporation, has relocated its main newsroom to the Phoenix campus of the Walter Cronkite School for Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. We have also just announced a new Alaska bureau and we will continue our presence in Washington, DC. We are still owned by the non-profit arm of the National Congress of American Indians but we operate independently. That means raising our own budget from a variety of sources, including tribes, foundations, and individuals.

Indian Country Today has grown fast since restarting in June 2018. We now have 10 full-time employees and we hope by this time next year that number will be about two dozen. We now have two divisions, the mobile platform where most people see our work (we passed 500,000 unique viewers this month) and a broadcast division.

We need you, too. Please consider being our partner. Support from you demonstrates to foundations, tribes, and other funders that this project is significant -- and worth doing.

We decided from the beginning that we wanted Indian Country Today to be free. There are no subscriptions (or even fees for media that use our content). We think that news in Indian Country should be, as Cherokee Chief John Ross once said, “as free as the breeze.” But to do that we need readers to support our cause.

"I think a lot about the perception of American Indians and Alaska Natives in the media," Trahant said. "We all know the stereotypes and narratives that come out of Hollywood or Washington. So a news program, one that reaches millions of people via public television stations, has the chance to change the story, showing the beauty, intelligence, and aspirations of Native people."

Thank you for helping us make our vision so. And please stay in touch as we move forward.