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Noel Lyn Smith
ICT

November is Native American Heritage Month, a time to recognize the contributions of Native people in the United States and celebrate the diverse cultures, traditions and histories of Native nations.

The first recognition can be traced back to the early 20th century. But U.S. presidents did not start issuing annual proclamations and designations until 1990, when former President George H.W. Bush signed a joint resolution.

President Joe Biden Jr. signed this year's proclamation on Oct. 31

"My administration will continue to write a new and better chapter in the story of our Nation-to-Nation relationships," Biden stated in the document. "We will always honor the profound impact Native Americans continue to have in shaping our nation and bringing us closer to the more perfect Union we know we can and must be."

The proclamation also designates Nov. 25 as Native American Heritage Day.

Activities tied to Native American Heritage Month have been taking place and there are more to come as November draws to a close. This list has some activities. There could be some happening in your community.

Nationwide

Rock Your Mocs

More information: rockyourmocs.org. A positive opportunity to be united and celebrate tribal individuality by wearing moccasins. Wear your moccasins or Turquoise Awareness Ribbon. Use the #ROCKYOURMOCS hashtag on social media.

Eastern Time Zone

New York City

Where We Belong
When: Now through Nov. 27
Where: The Public’s LuEsther Hall, 425 Lafayette St. at Astor Place
More information: “Where We Belong” is written and performed by Madeline Sayet (Mohegan) and directed by Mei Ann Teo. “In 2015, Mohegan theater-maker Madeline Sayet moved to England to pursue a PhD in Shakespeare, grappling with the question of what it means to remain or leave, as the Brexit vote threatens to further disengage the UK from the wider world,” according to the news release. “Moving between nations that have failed to reckon with their ongoing roles in colonialism, she finds comfort in the journeys of her Native ancestors who had to cross the ocean in the 1700s to help her people. In this intimate and exhilarating solo piece directed by Mei Ann Teo, Sayet asks us what it means to belong in an increasingly globalized world.” Free tickets are available to Indigenous and Native community members. For show and ticket information, publictheater.org/productions/season/2223/where-we-belong/.

Native American Heritage Program with James Jones
When: Nov. 25
Time: 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4 p.m.
Where: National Museum of the American Indian, Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, One Bowling Green
More information: This program will teach visitors about the meaning and history of hoop dancing in Native American culture. Top-ranking hoop dancer Joseph Secody (Navajo) will demonstrate the dance.

Washington, D.C.

2022 Native Cinema Showcase
When: Nov. 18-25
Where: Online
More information: The National Museum of the American Indian presents its annual celebration of the best in Indigenous film. This online program offers 35 films, representing 30 Native nations in eight countries.

Film Screening: “Imagining the Indian: The Fight Against Native American Mascoting”
When: Nov. 19
Time: 2 p.m.
Where: National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street & Independence Avenue, SW
More information: This 95-minute film examines the movement to eliminate demeaning and offensive words, images and gestures from sports. “The film takes a deep dive into the issues through archival footage and interviews with those involved in the fight,” according to the museum’s news release. Aviva Kempner and Ben West (Cheyenne) directed and produced the film. A conversation with Native rights advocate Suzan Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee), NMAI Director Cynthia Chavez Lamar (San Felipe Pueblo/Hopi/Tewa/Navajo), Smithsonian Under Secretary for Museums and Culture Kevin Gover (Pawnee), and NMAI Founding Director W. Richard West Jr. (Southern Cheyenne) will follow the screening.

Native American Heritage Program with Tony Duncan
When: Nov. 25
Time: 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m.
Where: National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street & Independence Avenue, SW
More information: This program will teach visitors about the meaning and history of hoop dancing in Native American culture. Five-time world champion hoop dancer Tony Duncan (San Carlos Apache/Mandan-Hidatsa-Arikara) will demonstrate the dance.

Mountain Time Zone

Utah

Native American Heritage Month Poetry Reading by Laura Tohe (Navajo)
When: Nov. 16
Time: 10 a.m.
Where: Salt Lake Community College Student Writing & Reading Center, 4600 S. Redwood Road in Salt Lake City
More information: Facebook event page

New Mexico

Friends Lecture: Pat Pruitt
When: Nov. 15
Time: 2:30 p.m.-4 p.m.
Where: Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, 704 Camino Lejo in Santa Fe
More information: Pat Pruitt is a contemporary artist known for his cutting-edge work that uses innovative materials, design and fabrication techniques, according to the museum. His Native American heritage inspires his jewelry. Zoom or in-person registration are available at wheelwright.org/event/friends-lecture-patt-pruitt/. Admission to the museum is $10 but free for museum members, Native Americans, children under 12, students with valid ID and active military.

Friends Book Club: "The Marrow Thieves"
When: Nov. 16
Time: 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Where: Zoom via the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian
More information: “The Marrow Thieves” is a novel by Métis Canadian writer Cherie Dimaline. Zoom registration for the discussion is at www.wheelwright.org/event/friends-book-club-the-marrow-thieves/.

3rd annual Holiday Art Market
When: Nov. 26
Time: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Where: Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, 704 Camino Lejo in Santa Fe
More information: Free admission to the museum for this event. The following Native American artists are confirmed to attend: Cippy Crazy Horse (jewelry), Felicia Fragua (pottery), Kevin Honyouti (carvings/mixed media), Ronald Honyouti (carvings/mixed media), Daniel Jim (jewelry), Janice BlackElk-Jim (jewelry) and Robert Michael Weahkee (carvings).

Arizona

Film screening: "Finding Nemo in Navajo"
When: Nov. 20
Time: 2 p.m.
Where: The Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. in Tucson
More information: loftcinema.org. This free screening is co-presented by the University of Arizona Native American Law Students Association, Indigenous Strategies and The Loft Cinema.

Film screening: "Inhabitants: An Indigenous Perspective"
When: Nov. 20
Time: 5 p.m.
Where: The Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. in Tucson
More information: loftcinema.org. There will be a Q-and-A with Michael Kotutwa Johnson (Hopi), who served on the tribal advisory board for the film. Live music at 4 p.m. by Gertie and the T.O. Boyz. This free screening is presented by Science on Screen and co-presented by the University of Arizona Indigenous Resilience Center. Johnson is assistant specialist at the center.

Speaker series: Traditional O’odham Agriculture
When: Nov. 23
Time: 1 p.m.
Where: Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, 1100 W. Ruins Dr. in Coolidge
More information: Facebook event page

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Run the Land
When: Nov. 25
Time: 8 a.m.-11 a.m.
Where: Granite Reef Recreational Area, North Bush Highway. This site is located 14 miles northeast of Mesa.
More Information: Native Women Running is partnering with REI to celebrate being outside and on the land. Together, they are celebrating Run the Land for Native American Heritage Month. During this activity, participants may run, hike or walk. The meeting point is the Saguaro access trailhead (north of Granite Reef Recreational parking area). The area requires a Tonto Recreation Pass. Native Women Running will have day permits available. More details about the activity are here.

Speaker series: Our River Stories - The Gila and the Salt
When: Nov. 30
Time: 1 p.m.
Where: Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, 1100 W. Ruins Dr. in Coolidge
More information: Facebook event page

The following activities are part of the 2022 Arizona Native American Recognition Days, a collaboration between the Phoenix Indian Center, Native American Connections and Native Health in Phoenix.

Tribal Opioid & Substance Use Conference
When: Nov. 17-18
Time: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Where: We-Ko-Pa Casino Resort, 10438 Wekopa Way in Fort McDowell

41st annual Fort McDowell Orme Dam Victory Days
When: Nov. 18-20, $5 parking fee each day
Where: Fort McDowell Rodeo Grounds, 9500 S. Rodeo Grounds in Fort McDowell
More information: Various events will take place throughout the weekend, www.fmyn.org/events/

Ornament Marketplace
When: Nov. 25-27
Time: 10 a.m.
Where: Heard Museum Shop, 2301 N. Central Ave. in Phoenix
More information: Marketplace offers one-of-a-kind ornaments made by Native American artists, 602-252-8840.

2022 Tribal Health Symposium, Interconnection: Weaving Tradition in Health
When: Nov. 29
Time: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Where: Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass, 5594 W. Wild Horse Pass Blvd. in Phoenix

2022 Arizona American Indian Excellence in Leadership Awards
When: Nov. 30
Time: 6 p.m.-8 p.m.
Where: Heard Museum, 2301 N. Central Ave. in Phoenix
More information: www.phxindcenter.org

Pacific Time Zone

California

Basket Weaving Workshop
When: Nov. 15
Time: 4 p.m.-6 p.m.
Where: First Peoples’ Center, SUN 3309, on the California State University San Bernardino campus, 5500 University Parkway
More information: www.csusb.edu/native-american-heritage-month/calendar-events

Wisdom Wednesday: Molly Springer
When: Nov. 16
Time: Noon-1 p.m.
Where: First Peoples’ Center, SUN 3309, on the California State University San Bernardino campus, 5500 University Parkway
More information: This event is part of CSUSB’s celebration of Native American Heritage Month. Molly Springer (Cherokee Nation/Osage) is the associate vice president of student success and educational equity in the Division of Student Affairs at CSUSB. “Come have a relaxing afternoon in the First Peoples’ Center as we soak in words of wisdom from our Indigenous leaders here at CSUSB,” the university’s news release states.

California Truth & Healing Council Quarterly Meeting
When: Nov. 18
Time: 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Where: Yasuda Center for Extended Learning on the California State University San Bernardino campus, 5500 University Parkway
More information: The California Truth & Healing Council, created by an executive order signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, is visiting the campus. The council is authorized to record, examine and receive narratives from California Native Americans about the historical relationship between the state and Indigenous peoples. The agenda and registration information are on the Governor's Office of Tribal Affairs website.

Native American Heritage Month Closing Ceremony with California State Assembly Member James Ramos and Bird Singing
When: Nov. 29
Time: 2 p.m.-3 p.m.
Where: SMSU North Court Patio on the California State University San Bernardino campus, 5500 University Parkway
More information: Assembly Member James Ramos, D-Highland, is the first California Native American elected to serve in the legislative branch. He is a member of the Serrano & Cahuilla tribes and a Cal State San Bernardino alumnus.

Wisdom Wednesday: Robert Levi
When: Nov. 30
Time: Noon-1 p.m.
Where: SMSU North Court Patio on the California State University San Bernardino campus, 5500 University Parkway
More information: This event is part of CSUSB’s celebration of Native American Heritage Month. Robert Levi (Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians) is the inaugural elder in residence and a special consultant at CSUSB. “Come have a relaxing afternoon in the First Peoples’ Center as we soak in words of wisdom from our Indigenous leaders here at CSUSB,” the university’s news release states.

Washington

United Indians Native Art Market
When: Nov. 19-20
Time: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Where: Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center in Discovery Park, 5011 Bernie Whitebear Way in Seattle
More information: www.unitedindians.org/events/native-art-market/

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