Updated:
Original:

War on Greed is War on Terror: Many Say 'No' to ExxonMobil

Author:

The American people have to face reality even more squarely in the face. At this time, reality is facing them and they donít like it. Reality is a huge gauge in gas prices. Reality is an oil company, in the midst of steep price increases, posting the highest-ever profit levels and retiring a CEO with half a billion dollars in payouts for a job well done.

That would be Exxon Mobil Corp., at more than $8.2 billion in profits for the first quarter. Reality is then a second major oil company, Chevron Corp., posting a near-50 percent increase in profits ñ to $4 billion ñ for the same quarter.

Interestingly, the oil companies making it hand over fist at the pump are the ones most dependent on Middle Eastern oil. And one, ExxonMobil, has done more to obfuscate and confuse the legitimate issue of global warming than any other entity on earth.

At the pump, motorists wonder just when their particular family or company budget must shrink its transportation activity (schools in Tennessee districts are forced to reduce school days). How much are you capable of paying for gas and still use as much as you are used to?

Most of the country is past $3 per gallon. Can you afford $4 dollars per gallon, $5 or $6 or $8 per gallon, and still continue to drive and use as much gas and oil as you are accustomed. Because this appears to be the precise intersection the oil companies are seeking to pinpoint.

How much can they charge you before price diminishes their sales? As the ExxonMobil CEO said, just recently on national television, ìWe answer to our stockholders. We are in business to make money.î

The gouging for required energy inputs ñ gas for our cars, most personally ñ is on. Reality is facing the American people quite starkly in this context. For people of moderate and low incomes, forced to drive long distances for basic commodities, which includes many American Indian families, the present gouging is traumatizing.

Do not be fooled by the blaming of the victim this time. Americans are not ìaddictsî for using oil. Oil is not an option but a required survival element in the industrial world.

We have been made dependent on oil and, more precisely, on the convenient idea of cheap and abundant oil. That idea, like so many others invoked to sell us things by corporations (ìin business to make moneyî), turns out to be a lie.

Oil will only be more expensive, less accessible and, since itís controlled by a handful of corporate mammoths, meted out to us mere mortals at arbitrary prices designed to squeeze and wring all possible wealth out of a captured public.

The difference now is that the public is starting to stir. The American public has finally been knocked from its century-long stupor. It is increasingly aware of from where and how it buys its oil and calls for boycotts and directed buying are rising across the land.

No matter how many oil company executives, in and out of government, diagram the many reasons why prices have risen so rapidly and why Middle Eastern oil is so precious to the American economy, people donít believe them anymore.

In a type of impasse that borders on impotence, Congress is characteristically coming up short on workable ideas. The Democrats wanted to offer a 60-day suspension of the oil companiesí federal gas tax of 18.4 cents a gallon, another loony boon to the oil companies, while the Republicans went for the $100 rebate (the Dems would make that $500), which the public immediately ridiculed ìas a paltry and transparent effort to pander to voters before the midterm elections in November,î as reported in The New York Times.

Other tired and ongoingly manipulative ideas include new incentives for the oil industry to explore more (they donít get it); opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to drilling (minor national gain); and imploring consumers to purchase hybrid cars (how about mandatory high-mileage engines?).

Republican leaders sharply criticize the high gasoline prices and roll their eyes at the high energy industry profits, but their negotiators under pressure from President George W. Bush have killed provisions in a major tax bill to close shameful tax loopholes and significantly tax the oil companies billions of dollars more ñ something the country could use, above all else. The problem is, according to the president, ìAmericans are addicted to oil.î

The people are rejecting the trinkets and the blame this time because the real issue is the widespread feeling that our very lives are now brazenly manipulated by Big Oil and its corrupt, bought-off administration and Congress.

As with the immigration issue, where the regular people have had to take to the streets to get politiciansí attention, the question of high oil and gas prices should dash against the sea wall that is an administration and a Congress drenched in oil money.

The new public logic dictates that there will not be any justice in the energy sector until the people willfully direct their purchasing power to send a message of independence and human, rather than corporate, value.

Consider ExxonMobil. Perhaps the people of North America should avoid buying their gas from a company that is not only gauging the public miserably, but over the past decade has carried out the biggest campaign internationally to discredit the established science of global warming and climate change.

As Al Gore recently told Eleanor Clift in Newsweek magazine: ìThe behavior of ExxonMobil is disgraceful. They finance, in whole or in part, 40 organizations that put out disinformation on global warming designed to confuse the American people.î

The former vice presidentís statement is well-documented. ExxonMobil is deeply involved in affecting the way people address the global warming issue, besmirching the bases of the widespread scientific consensus that would lead to reasonable action on the issue.

We donít deny that ExxonMobil gives away millions of dollars to many good causes, including American Indian education, but as people who purchase oil and gas products and who care about the future of our children, we are well within our rights to send a message.

We say enough ñ enough gouging and enough misinformation. Letís get serious about from whom we buy our gas.

Here is a start: ExxonMobil, Shell, ChevronTexaco and Marathon/Speedway all import more than 100 million barrels annually from the Middle East, essentially financing the core economies of the anti-American jihad.

Here is a list of gas companies that donít buy oil from the Middle East and who are not engaged in directly confusing issues that affect us all: Citgo, Sunoco, Conoco, Sinclair, BP/Phillips, Hess and ARCO.

Try them. Co-empower them, rather than a company that takes advantage of us as a common public and wantonly get in the way of truth in crucial scientific inquiry that affects all Americans and all people, as opposed to one corporationís particular, profit-focused shareholders.

We encourage tribes and all Native entities to do the right thing for the future generations and research the oil companies with whom they do business. Economic empowerment is the basis of all sovereignty.

The American people have to face reality even more squarely in the face. At this time, reality is facing them and they donít like it. Reality is a huge gauge in gas prices. Reality is an oil company, in the midst of steep price increases, posting the highest-ever profit levels and retiring a CEO with half a billion dollars in payouts for a job well done.That would be Exxon Mobil Corp., at more than $8.2 billion in profits for the first quarter. Reality is then a second major oil company, Chevron Corp., posting a near-50 percent increase in profits ñ to $4 billion ñ for the same quarter. Interestingly, the oil companies making it hand over fist at the pump are the ones most dependent on Middle Eastern oil. And one, ExxonMobil, has done more to obfuscate and confuse the legitimate issue of global warming than any other entity on earth.At the pump, motorists wonder just when their particular family or company budget must shrink its transportation activity (schools in Tennessee districts are forced to reduce school days). How much are you capable of paying for gas and still use as much as you are used to?Most of the country is past $3 per gallon. Can you afford $4 dollars per gallon, $5 or $6 or $8 per gallon, and still continue to drive and use as much gas and oil as you are accustomed. Because this appears to be the precise intersection the oil companies are seeking to pinpoint.How much can they charge you before price diminishes their sales? As the ExxonMobil CEO said, just recently on national television, ìWe answer to our stockholders. We are in business to make money.îThe gouging for required energy inputs ñ gas for our cars, most personally ñ is on. Reality is facing the American people quite starkly in this context. For people of moderate and low incomes, forced to drive long distances for basic commodities, which includes many American Indian families, the present gouging is traumatizing.Do not be fooled by the blaming of the victim this time. Americans are not ìaddictsî for using oil. Oil is not an option but a required survival element in the industrial world.We have been made dependent on oil and, more precisely, on the convenient idea of cheap and abundant oil. That idea, like so many others invoked to sell us things by corporations (ìin business to make moneyî), turns out to be a lie.Oil will only be more expensive, less accessible and, since itís controlled by a handful of corporate mammoths, meted out to us mere mortals at arbitrary prices designed to squeeze and wring all possible wealth out of a captured public.The difference now is that the public is starting to stir. The American public has finally been knocked from its century-long stupor. It is increasingly aware of from where and how it buys its oil and calls for boycotts and directed buying are rising across the land.No matter how many oil company executives, in and out of government, diagram the many reasons why prices have risen so rapidly and why Middle Eastern oil is so precious to the American economy, people donít believe them anymore.In a type of impasse that borders on impotence, Congress is characteristically coming up short on workable ideas. The Democrats wanted to offer a 60-day suspension of the oil companiesí federal gas tax of 18.4 cents a gallon, another loony boon to the oil companies, while the Republicans went for the $100 rebate (the Dems would make that $500), which the public immediately ridiculed ìas a paltry and transparent effort to pander to voters before the midterm elections in November,î as reported in The New York Times.Other tired and ongoingly manipulative ideas include new incentives for the oil industry to explore more (they donít get it); opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to drilling (minor national gain); and imploring consumers to purchase hybrid cars (how about mandatory high-mileage engines?).Republican leaders sharply criticize the high gasoline prices and roll their eyes at the high energy industry profits, but their negotiators under pressure from President George W. Bush have killed provisions in a major tax bill to close shameful tax loopholes and significantly tax the oil companies billions of dollars more ñ something the country could use, above all else. The problem is, according to the president, ìAmericans are addicted to oil.îThe people are rejecting the trinkets and the blame this time because the real issue is the widespread feeling that our very lives are now brazenly manipulated by Big Oil and its corrupt, bought-off administration and Congress.As with the immigration issue, where the regular people have had to take to the streets to get politiciansí attention, the question of high oil and gas prices should dash against the sea wall that is an administration and a Congress drenched in oil money. The new public logic dictates that there will not be any justice in the energy sector until the people willfully direct their purchasing power to send a message of independence and human, rather than corporate, value.Consider ExxonMobil. Perhaps the people of North America should avoid buying their gas from a company that is not only gauging the public miserably, but over the past decade has carried out the biggest campaign internationally to discredit the established science of global warming and climate change.As Al Gore recently told Eleanor Clift in Newsweek magazine: ìThe behavior of ExxonMobil is disgraceful. They finance, in whole or in part, 40 organizations that put out disinformation on global warming designed to confuse the American people.î The former vice presidentís statement is well-documented. ExxonMobil is deeply involved in affecting the way people address the global warming issue, besmirching the bases of the widespread scientific consensus that would lead to reasonable action on the issue.We donít deny that ExxonMobil gives away millions of dollars to many good causes, including American Indian education, but as people who purchase oil and gas products and who care about the future of our children, we are well within our rights to send a message.We say enough ñ enough gouging and enough misinformation. Letís get serious about from whom we buy our gas.Here is a start: ExxonMobil, Shell, ChevronTexaco and Marathon/Speedway all import more than 100 million barrels annually from the Middle East, essentially financing the core economies of the anti-American jihad.Here is a list of gas companies that donít buy oil from the Middle East and who are not engaged in directly confusing issues that affect us all: Citgo, Sunoco, Conoco, Sinclair, BP/Phillips, Hess and ARCO.Try them. Co-empower them, rather than a company that takes advantage of us as a common public and wantonly get in the way of truth in crucial scientific inquiry that affects all Americans and all people, as opposed to one corporationís particular, profit-focused shareholders.We encourage tribes and all Native entities to do the right thing for the future generations and research the oil companies with whom they do business. Economic empowerment is the basis of all sovereignty.