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Want to Earn Extra Cash Monitoring Food Prices on the Rez?

First Nations Development Institute is looking for people on or near reservations and Alaska Native villages to monitor and report food prices.
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First Nations Development Institute is looking for people on or near reservations and Alaska Native villages to monitor and report food prices monthly over a 12-month period.

Participants will collect prices on a list of food products sold in Native communities and then report the prices in an online database. First Nations will use that information to update and expand its initial 2015 reportIndian Country Food Price Index: Exploring Variation in Food Pricing Across Native Communities.

“Most reservation and village consumers believe they pay more for food products than consumers in urban areas, but there is little data on food prices in Native communities to fully substantiate the claim,” says a press release from First Nations. In 2015, First Nations collected food prices in Native communities, and the report was an overview of that. “That report found that, on average, many food products were more expensive with the exception of some junk foods. Building on this initial effort, First Nations is seeking individuals, organizations or tribes to collect monthly prices in their local community’s retail outlet.”

Monthly prices will be collected on:

Loaf of white bread

One pound of ground beef

Whole chicken (price per pound)

One dozen large eggs

One gallon of whole, fortified milk

Red delicious apples (price per pound)

Pound of tomatoes

Coffee (ground, cost per pound) of a common brand such as Folger’s. Prices will include both regular and decaffeinated.

Participants will enter their data online by the 15th of each month, and at the end of a year, the data will be shared with Indian country via the revised Indian Country Food Price Index report. Participants will be paid $500 at the end of the study.

Applications to participate are due by September 8, 2016, and can be filled out online.

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