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Video: Cherokee Elder Talks Doll-Making and the ‘Creature from the Black Lagoon’

As the eighth of ten children, Cherokee Elder Betty Brewer and her siblings knew how to have a good time with very little.
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As the eighth of ten children, Cherokee Elder Betty Brewer and her siblings knew how to have a good time with very little.

“Liniment used to come in a bottle… we had a family of dolls and they were all bottles,” she laughed at the memory in the video. “We even had the little Vix jar, that was our baby because it was little and fat.”

They also used corn as dolls—the silk was the hair and their mother would draw a face on the stalk. “Sometimes they were pretty, and sometimes they were pretty ugly,” she laughed. After play time, the corn was cooked and eaten.

Their father was a carpenter, so she and her brother would use leftover blocks of wood to build cities in the woods.

Betty was one of only two of her siblings born at the hospital, the rest of her siblings were born at home.

She and her siblings liked playing and swimming in the creek, but after the movie “Creature from the Black Lagoon” came out it scared them all. “I was going along one day, and I happen to look down, and I saw my shadow. I thought it was that creature from the Black Lagoon! I think I might have just went on home,” she laughs.

Here more about how Betty grew up below: