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The Snoqualmie Indian Tribe Helps Grant Super Bowl XLIX Wishes

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Some families will be attending Super Bowl XLIX this year in Glendale, Arizona, with the help of the Make-A-Wish Foundation’s Alaska and Washington chapters, and the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe.

"Last year we sent three families to the ‘The Big Game’. This year we are so pleased that our tribe is once again able to share its tradition of helping others by giving these very special children and their families the opportunity to make a wish come true," said Tribal Chairwoman Carolyn Lubenau.

The tribe donated tickets to the Super Bowl as well as assisted with travel expenses for the families. They also made a $5,000 donation to Make-A-Wish. “The Snoqualmie Indian Tribe is incredibly honored to support the work that Make-A-Wish does for families in our community, and we are so thankful that we could help,” Lubenau added.? ?

One of last year’s recipients was Kevin Lee, whose wish was to meet the Seahawks’ Russell Wilson. After he “signed” a five-year contract with the team, he proclaimed that the Seahawks would advance to the Super Bowl. So when the Seahawks actually made it to the game in 2014, they extended his wish and sent Lee to the Super Bowl.

Since 1986, Make-A-Wish Alaska and Washington has granted wishes to more than 5,500 children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy.

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According to a 2011 U.S. study of wish impact, most health professionals surveyed believe a wish-come-true can influence the health of children. Kids say wishes give them renewed strength to fight their illnesses, and their parents say these experiences help strengthen the entire family.

For the second year in a row, the Sehawks have earned their spot in the Super Bowl. They will face the New England Patriots on Feb. 1.