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Smart Kids Wanted: No Money Required

Wayne State University has announced a program to provide doctors to underserved communities, ten at a time, by awarding full rides for all four years

Wayne State University has announced a program to provide doctors to underserved communities, ten at a time, by awarding full rides for all four years of undergraduate education and all four years of medical school, including room and board. The total value of each of these ten packages is about $251,000.

Wayne State University began in 1868 as Detroit Medical College, and is now one of three excellent state supported research universities in Michigan. The other two may be better known—the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and Michigan State University in East Lansing—but Wayne State has acquired its reputation while serving urban areas and minority students.

The number of white students at Wayne State is usually just over 50 percent. Two census categories put together, American Indian or Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, approximates one half of one percent of the student body. The most common minority, blacks, are just under 20 percent. Diversity at Wayne State is by class as well as by race.

The new program to educate ten doctors a year at no cost to families is called Wayne Med-Direct. It’s a continuation of Wayne State’s historical mission to serve underserved communities. That would include most of Indian country.

Besides being relieved of money pressure, Wayne Med-Direct students will be exposed to hands-on research and clinical training in the School of Medicine while still undergraduates.

Applications will be accepted until January 15 for next year’s freshman Wayne Med-Direct class. The selected students will start in summer school with “enrichment courses” in chemistry, biology, physics, and writing.

The minimum requirements are a 3.5 grade point average and a score of 1340 on the SAT or 30 on the ACT. Students may apply from anywhere.

Wayne Med-Direct is aimed at exceptional students from low-income backgrounds and preference will be given to students who plan to study health disparities among communities and how to address them. It is expected that many of the students selected will be minorities underrepresented in the medical profession.

For more information, and to apply visit Honors.Wayne.edu.