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Sitting Bull A Life in Photos

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Sitting Bull's Vision, by Michael Gentry (1940-1994). Sitting Bull’s revelation at 1875 Sun Dance. Via Wikipedia: In 1875, the Northern Cheyenne, Hunkpapa, Oglala, Sans Arc, and Minneconjou camped together for a Sun Dance, with both the Cheyenne medicine man White Bull or Ice and Sitting Bull in association. This ceremonial alliance preceded their fighting together in 1876 [at The Battle of Little Big Horn]. At the climactic moment Sitting Bull intoned, "The Great Spirit has given our enemies to us. We are to destroy them. We do not know who they are. They may be soldiers."

"The Custer Fight" by Charles Marion Russell. Lithograph. Shows the Battle of Little Bighorn, from the Indian side. 1876, June 25-26. Battle of the Greasy Grass, aka Battle of Little Bighorn painting: Library Of Congress/Wikipedia

Sitting Bull circa 1882. Sitting Bull after surrendering in 1881, during transit from Fort Randall to Standing Rock Agency, photo taken in Pierre, S.D. After Custer’s defeat at Little Big Horn, The U.S.Army flooded the area with more soldiers. Sitting Bull and his followers refused to surrender, and crossed into Canada’s North-West Territories in May 1887. They lived in exile for four years, but hunger led them to return to the U.S. and surrender on 19 July 1881.

Sitting Bull, card with signature circa 1882. The same photo as previous, this time as a souvenir for sale during Sitting Bull’s time touring with Alvaren Allen’s and Wild Bill Cody’s Wild West shows in 1884 and 1885. This was autographed in Sitting Bull's square hand in lower portion of the mount. photo: Cowan's Auctions

Portrait of Sitting Bull and his family 1883. Portrait of Sitting Bull and his family wearing traditional regalia. Sitting Bull's mother, Her Holy Door sits on his right, wives Four Robes and Seen-By-The-Nation stand behind him, and his oldest daughter, Many Horses and her son sit on his left. Sitting Bull holds a pipe and pipe bag on is lap. Hand written note on verso of card reads, "Sitting Bull & family, Ta Tonka E U tanki, Sioux." via The William F. Cody Archive/McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Crow Foot, Sitting Bull's Son. Circa 1885. photo: David F. Barry/Library of Congress

Standing Holy, Sitting Bull's Daughter circa 1885. photo: David F. Barry/Library of Congress

Sitting Bull circa 1885 photo: David F. Barry/Library of Congress

Sitting Bull circa 1885 Montreal, QC, August 1885. photo: William Notman & Son/via Sitting Bull College,IMLS

Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill in William Notman studios, Montreal. Montreal, QC, August 1885. photo: William Notman & Son/via Sitting Bull College,IMLS

Council of Sitting Bull and other Indians at Standing Rock,1886 Fort Yates, D.T, September to December 1886. Sitting Bull in a circle of people, wearing blanket and looking around. photo credit: David F. Barry/via Sitting Bull College, IMLS

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 07 January, 1888. An illustrated article about a recent Sioux Council at standing Rock Agency to consider questions of divine of their reservation lands. Major James McLaughlin, Standing Rock Agent, is portrayed, as is Standing Bull addressing the council. Frank Leslie's illustrated newspaper, v. 65, no. 1686 (1888 Jan. 7), p. 349. photo: Library of Congress

Indian Service agent James McLaughlin, of Fort Yates, in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 07 January, 1888. In 1890 McLaughlin would order Sitting Bull's arrest,leading to his killing. photo: Library of Congress

Text of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper article,07 January, 1888, on “The Sioux Indians of Dakota.” Photo: Library of Congress

Sitting Bull address council, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper article, 07 January 1888 photo: Library Of Congress

U.S. Commissioners and Delegations of Sioux Chiefs Visiting Washington D.C. and U.S. Capitol., Sitting Bull, 3rd row,far left October 15, 1888 U.S. Commissioners and Delegations of Sioux Chiefs Visiting Washington D.C. and U.S. Capitol. This photo shows the Sioux delegation in front of the capitol building with Sitting Bull (third row, far left). US Government's purpose of the Sioux visit: to discuss implementation of the Dawes' General Allotment Act on the Great Sioux Reservation - the division, rationing and allotment of tribal lands to Sioux individuals, followed by sale of 'excess' lands to white settlers, in order to extinguish "communal [Indian] title to their land and for the dissolution of the tribal governments, with the object of making the tribes a constituent part of the United States"; and to "deplete the land base, [thus] ending hunting as a means of subsistence.” photo: C.M. Bell/Library of Congress

Crop of U.S. Commissioners & Delegations of Sioux Chiefs Visiting Wash. D.C. & U.S. Capitol., Sitting Bull, 3rd row far left October 15, 1888 U.S. Commissioners and Delegations of Sioux Chiefs Visiting Washington D.C. and U.S. Capitol. photo: C.M. Bell/Library of Congress

Closer crop of previous photo. Sitting Bull visits U.S. Capitol, October 15, 1888 October 15, 1888 U.S. Commissioners and Delegations of Sioux Chiefs Visiting Washington D.C. and U.S. Capitol. photo: C.M. Bell/Library of Congress

Dec 15, 1890 Sitting Bull is killed. Indian Service agent James McLaughlin, in charge of Standing Rock Agency, to which Sitting Bull returned after his work with Wild Bill’s Wild West Show, grew concerned that Sitting Bull would flee the reservation to join The Ghost Dancers, a religious movement gaining popularity among Native Americans. He sent two Indian agents to arrest him - Henry Bullhead and Red Tomahawk. When they confronted Sitting Bull early in the morning of 15 December 1890, ordering him to get on his horse and come with them, Sitting Bull refused. When the agents began to use force on Sitting Bull, several Lakota responded with gun shot. Indian agent Bullhead was shot but not before shooting Sitting Bull in the chest. Red Tomahawk then shot Sitting Bull in the head, and he died several hours later (as did Henry Bullhead). Sitting Bull was buried at Fort Yates, North Dakota.

circa 1891. Sitting Bull's Family. Left to right, standing: daughter, Standing Holly; widow, Seen By Her Nation; widow, Lodge In Sight; widow, Four Robes. Seated, uncertain (?) photo: Library Of Congress.

Circa 1891. D.F. Barry Photograph of Sitting Bull's Home 2010, American History, Including the Civil War, June 11 A photograph captioned along lower margin of image Sitting Bull's House and Family, with Barry's copyright below title and West Superior, WI imprint on mount, 6.25 x 8.75 in., mounted on card stock, 6.75 x 9.75 in. The photograph features two of Sitting Bull's wives, possibly Four Robes and Seen By The Nation (sisters), and two daughters outside log cabin at Grand River, South Dakota, Standing Rock Reservation.

1920 Sitting Bull's Gun 1920 Sitting Bull's Gun Cowan's Auctions, Lot 817 Sitting Bull's Whitney Revolver, 2005, Historic Americana / Nov 16, 17 & 18 Sold: copy18,000.00. Price includes Buyer's Premium Second Model Whitney Navy Revolver, a grey, heavily used revolver, showing evidence of much hard use. Two-piece walnut grips, with right side inscribed “DIE 1890 SITTING BULL.” With a matching hand-made harness leather fringed holster, with “DIE 1890 SITTING BULL” carved into its surface. The holster exhibits heavy wear from the contours of the revolver. The historic revolver was given to Colonel Alfred Burton Welch of Mandan, North Dakota in April 1920 by No-Two Horns, a Hunkpapa chief and cousin of Sitting Bull. Photo: Cowan's Auctions

U.S. Vice President Charles Curtis (Kaw Nation) receives peace pipe from Chief Red Tomahawk, slayer of Sitting Bull, 21 June 1929 photo: Library Of Congress

Lakota family members exhumed what they believed to be Sitting Bull's remains from Fort Yates, North Dakota, transporting them for reinterment near Mobridge, South Dakota, his birthplace. A monument to him was erected there. photo credit: Tom Isern, 2007