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SCIA considers Roubideaux to lead IHS

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WASHINGTON - U.S. Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD) met with Dr. Yvette Roubideaux, a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, earlier this year. On April 23 the Senate Indian Affairs Committee considered her nomination to lead the Indian Health Service (IHS).

Johnson cited her commitment to improving health care in Indian country and her firsthand knowledge of IHS in urging the committee to quickly endorse her nomination.

Roubideaux was nominated by President Barrack Obama to lead IHS following her many years working to improve health care in Indian country. She has practiced internal medicine at Indian health care facilities and also worked at multiple IHS-run hospitals.

IHS is responsible for providing federal health care services, including health facilities and programs to Native Americans. An estimated 1.9 million Native Americans receive health care services through IHS or tribally-operated health programs.