Updated:
Original:

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Hosts Inter-Tribal Council Meetings

Muscogee (Creek) Nation is hosting the Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes today and tomorrow in Tulsa.
Author:

More than 400 people from around Indian country are expected to converge on Tulsa, Oklahoma today and tomorrow as the Muscogee (Creek) Nation is hosting the Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes.

Tribal leaders and representatives from the Muscogee (Creek), Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Seminole Nations will be on hand for the quarterly meeting that allows the tribes to discuss “significant issues facing all the tribes as well as to collaborate on projects and share ideas in tackling obstacles and promoting each tribe in their programs, departments and services,” according to a Muscogee press release.

MCN Principal Chief George Tiger is the current president of the Inter-Tribal Council.

Today will be filled with meetings on various topics, while the general session will be held tomorrow at 9 a.m. in Salon IV-V in the Renaissance Convention Center. Tribal leaders from all five tribes will speak during the general session.

Leaders and representatives of the Five Civilized Tribes formed the Inter-Tribal Council in 1949 following various meetings. The Council’s Constitution is built on it’s objectives and is as follows:

?”to secure to ourselves and our descendants the rights and benefits to which we are entitled under the laws of the United States of America, and the State of Oklahoma; to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of the Indian race; to preserve Indian cultural values; to enhance and promote general educational opportunity among members of the Five Civilized Tribes; to seek equitable adjustments of tribal affairs; to secure and to preserve rights under Indian Treaties with the United States; and other-wise to promote the common welfare of the American Indians.”

Chief Tiger, along with Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker, revived the council in 2012 when both were elected leaders of their tribes.