Skip to main content
Updated:
Original:

Métis Adoptee Crowdfunding to Reunite With His Siblings

A Métis adoptee now living in England is crowdfunding so he can travel to Canada to meet his 11 siblings, also affected by the Sixties Scoop.
Author:

Adopted as an infant from Saskatchewan and moved to the United Kingdom, Daniel Frost is ready to meet the 11 siblings he never knew he had in Canada, reports APTN National News.

Born to Métis parents and named Darin Maurice in 1968, he was taken and put in foster care as part of the Sixties Scoop. According to Indigenous Foundations, Patrick Johnston, author of the 1983 report “Native Children and the Child Welfare System,” coined the term, which refers to the mass removal of Aboriginal children from their families and their placement into the child welfare system.

“It was common practice in B.C. in the mid-sixties to ‘scoop’ from their mothers on reserves almost all newly born children,” a British Columbia social worker once told Johnston, according to Indigenous Foundations.

Daniel Frost is trying to raise money to visit his siblings in Canada.

Frost was one of those children. Last year, he started looking for his birth family, and what he found was a large extended family, starting with Edna Smith, who was also adopted by a British family, though they remained in Saskatchewan, reports APTN. After being contacted by Frost, she sent Frost photos of their siblings.

“Suddenly, I saw people looking back at me that looked like me,” Frost, 46, told APTN from London where he is training to be a nursing assistant. “I’ve even got a brother that looks like me. It’s something that is quite extraordinary.”

Frost grew up being confused for Spanish, Italian, or even Jewish because of his skin color. He told APTN that he was known as the “little brown boy.”

Frost’s entire family was separated by adoptions. Smith explained to APTN how a death in the family led to the children being put in foster care and later to the adoptions.

“I have a sister in B.C., I have a sister in Washington (State), I have a sister in Red Deer, one in North Battleford, a brother in Saskatoon, two brothers in Calgary, a brother in Regina, a brother in Dillon and Dan,” Smith told APTN.

Facebook

One of Frost's sisters, Edna Smith.

Frost is now raising money by crowdfunding on GoFundMe to go to Canada and visit the siblings he’s never met. Sadly, his birth parents are no longer alive. His mother walked on in 2010, and his father in 2013. He did receive a note from his mother in the ‘90s, which was the first time he started looking into his past.

He got a package from Saskatchewan, and in it was a handwritten note from his mother, addressed to “my darling son.”

“I was quite overwhelmed by it,” Frost told APTN. “Someone else was calling me her son.” He lost the note in a fire, and didn’t pick up the search again until last year. “I’m not sure I was mature enough to handle it at the time.”

He is ready for a reunion now, and so are his siblings.

“I think it’s awesome and we can’t wait for him to get over here,” Smith told APTN. “I look at him and I know he’s my brother.”

RELATED: Lawsuit Proceeds for Canada's Lost Generation of Stolen Babies