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Haskell Student Shares a Song Along the Trail of Broken Promises, a Trek to Protect Sacred Places

Native American student Millicent Pepion shares a song with those gathered at the Potawatomi Trail of Death marker in Brunswick, Missouri. Pepion, Navajo and Blackfeet, is a Haskell Indian Nations University student, member of the Wetlands Preservation Organization and a chief coordinator of the Trail of Broken Promises.
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In the video below, posted by the Trail of Broken Promises, Millicent Pepion shares a song with those gathered at the Potawatomi Trail of Death marker in Brunswick, Missouri. Pepion, Navajo and Blackfeet, is a Haskell Indian Nations University student, member of the Wetlands Preservation Organization and a chief coordinator of the Trail of Broken Promises.

The group of students and supporters left Lawrence, Kansas May 13 and are currently trekking their way to Washington, D.C. to raise awareness for the protection of sacred places. Once they arrive on July 9 they will call on Congress to enact a piece of draft legislation that made the journey with them—the Protection of Native American Sacred Places Act.

“We believe that Congress needs to address specific legislation to protect sacred places in an inclusive manner for all people whom those places affect,” Pepion said in a speech she gave to United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples James Anaya, during a consultation held May 3 at the University of Tulsa. “To make this point known we will carry the Protection of Native American Sacred Places Act. By walking the Trail of Broken Promises we call attention to the spiritual interconnectedness that we as human beings have with our environment and all elements within it.”

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