Giving thanks: Generosity in time of tragedy

Author:
Updated:
Original:

Each year, the Morongo Band of Mission Indians donates turkeys and Thanksgiving dinners for area families. Volunteers from the reservation and surrounding community will gather to box and distribute about 8,000 dinners over a five-day period. Although their generosity has become tradition, the Morongosí selfless act took on different tone this year.

In late October, the tribe made numerous contributions to the effort to battle the Esperanza wildfire that killed 10 people, including five firefighters. The outbreak of the fire prompted the tribe to respond in a matter of hours to both victims and support agencies, including the local chapter of the American Red Cross. They dispatched two

firetrucks to fight the blaze, donated food and water to Red Cross evacuation centers and hotel rooms to displaced victims, and earmarked $100,000 for the reward fund. Ultimately, the tribe lost more than 1,200 acres to the fire.

The Morongo tribeís commitment to good community relations with its neighbors, not only in a time of need, has set a high bar for others. It should be noted that other local tribes are due thanks as well. The California Nations Indian Gaming Association joined several tribes that donated to the numerous funds established for the firefighters who perished while trying to protect a home. We commend them all, and give thanks for their generosity.

Each year, the Morongo Band of Mission Indians donates turkeys and Thanksgiving dinners for area families. Volunteers from the reservation and surrounding community will gather to box and distribute about 8,000 dinners over a five-day period. Although their generosity has become tradition, the Morongosí selfless act took on different tone this year. In late October, the tribe made numerous contributions to the effort to battle the Esperanza wildfire that killed 10 people, including five firefighters. The outbreak of the fire prompted the tribe to respond in a matter of hours to both victims and support agencies, including the local chapter of the American Red Cross. They dispatched two firetrucks to fight the blaze, donated food and water to Red Cross evacuation centers and hotel rooms to displaced victims, and earmarked $100,000 for the reward fund. Ultimately, the tribe lost more than 1,200 acres to the fire. The Morongo tribeís commitment to good community relations with its neighbors, not only in a time of need, has set a high bar for others. It should be noted that other local tribes are due thanks as well. The California Nations Indian Gaming Association joined several tribes that donated to the numerous funds established for the firefighters who perished while trying to protect a home. We commend them all, and give thanks for their generosity.