Excavation begins on Flint burial site

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FLINT, Mich. (AP) – Excavation has begun on land in Flint where Native American remains were found.

The Flint Journal reported Aug. 15 that the team of archaeologists know few details except the remains are part of the Anishinabek. That’s a term used to encompass indigenous people including the Ojibwe, Potawatomi and Odawa.

The excavation is being funded by the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, which controls the remains. The Genesee County Land Bank, which had been developing the land near downtown when the remains were discovered last year, turned the land over to the tribe.

After excavation is completed, the tribe will have the remains studied and return them with a private ceremony. The Stone Street site will be turned into a memorial park.

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