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Devery Jacobs, Native Filmmakers Will Rock Native Crossroads Film Festival

Internationally acclaimed Indigenous-made or themed films will be screened at the 2017 Native Crossroads Film Festival, on April 7-8 in Norman, OK.

The feature film Te Ata and 10 other internationally acclaimed Indigenous-made or themed films will be screened at the 2017 Native Crossroads Film Festival, set for April 7 and 8 in Norman, Oklahoma. Past attendees of the Native Crossroads Film Festival include Chris Eyre, Wes Studi and Steven Paul Judd.

This year, actor and filmmaker Devery Jacobs and other filmmakers, including Kyle Bell, will be available for open discussions after the screenings.

Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs (Photo - Thosh Collins)

Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs (Thosh Collins) has been named as one of Indian Country's 50 Faces.

“Bodies in Motion” is the theme for this year’s festival and symposium that will highlight features, short, animation and documentary films. The festival will examine the presence of Native symbolism in history, sports, politics, the environment and popular culture.

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The schedule begins with Mara’akame’s Dream, directed by Federico Cecchetti, which focuses on a young Huichol Indian from Mexico who dreams of becoming a musician against the wishes of his traditional father. The afternoon feature Spear, directed by Stephen Page, is about a young Australian Aboriginal man who journeys to understand what it means to be a man with ancient traditions in a modern world.

Also on Friday, April 7, is Te Ata, directed by Nathan Frankowski. It tells the story of Mary Thompson Fisher, a woman who traversed cultural barriers to become one of the greatest American Indian performers of all time. Actors in the film include Q’orianka Kilcher, of The New World, Gil Birmingham, of Hell or High Water and Graham Greene, of Dances with Wolves.

The first public screening of “Te Ata” will be 1:30 p.m., May 4 at BFF, a week long film festival which champions women and diverse voices in media.

"Te Ata” tells the story of Mary Thompson Fisher, a woman who traversed cultural barriers to become one of the greatest American Indian performers of all time.

Short films will be featured on Friday afternoon and will include a filmmaker panel discussion.

Saturday films include:

Dig It if You Can, directed by Kyle Bell, and Stolen, directed by Devery Jacobs of Rhymes for Young Ghouls are two featured shorts.


The Sun at Midnight, filmed in the Arctic Circle and directed by Kirsten Carthew, tells the story of an unusual friendship between a hunter obsessed with finding a missing caribou herd and a teenage rebel (Devery Jacobs) who gets lost while on the run.

The Native Crossroads Film Festival evening’s feature film Maliglutit, directed by Zacharias Kunuk and Natar Ungalaaq, is set in Inuit country and tells the story of an Inuit woman and her daughter kidnapped by three Inuit men while her husband is away. The husband sets out on a journey to find his family and punish the perpetrators.

According to the release, the Native Crossroads Film Festival is a unique festival and symposium that focuses on international Indigenous media. The event puts academics, media creators, and community and tribal organization representatives into dialogue to advance the discussions in all these fields. At once entertaining, scholarly and educational, each year’s event explores particular themes of pressing importance to Native people, globally and locally.

Screenings and panel discussions at the Native Crossroads Film Festival will be held Friday in the Kerr Auditorium of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave., and Saturday in the Dick Bell Courtroom of Andrew M. Coats Hall, home of the University of Oklahoma College of Law, 300 W. Timberdell Road.

Bodies In Motion Poster - Courtesy Native Crossroads Film Festival

Bodies In Motion Poster

The Native Crossroads Film Festival is free and open to the public through the generous support of the Chickasaw Nation, OU Office of the Senior Vice President and Provost, OU College of Arts and Sciences, OU College of Law, Sam Noble Museum, Norman Arts Council, and OU Department of English. It is hosted by the OU Film and Media Studies Program and the OU Department of Native American Studies.

For a complete schedule of films, visit www.nativecrossroads.org/. For more information or accommodations, contact the organizers at native.crossroads@ou.edu or at (405) 325-3020.

Follow Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) - ICMN’s Arts and Entertainment, Pow Wows and Sports Editor - Follow @VinceSchilling