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Day of the Dead, Part III: Blending Traditions

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Day of the Dead or Dia de Los Muertos began as a Mexican holiday—a mixture of indigenous and Catholic religious beliefs—as a way to honor family members who are no longer among the living. The celebrations are recognized on November 2 following All Saints Day on November 1 and have seen similar celebrations appear around the world. Day of the Dead festivities can be found throughout Central and Latin America, along with areas of Europe and North America.

As with many traditions expanding and mixing with cultures the Day of the Dead festivities vary depending on the country and the groups. Some are more colorful than others, or offer more of a celebration of the life’s that once were, while others use it as a chance to reconnect, to catch up with the deceased loved ones.

Below are images of Day of the Dead celebrations from around the world:

Bolivia

Emerson Windy on the cover of his album 'Herojuana.'

Emerson Windy on the cover of his album 'Herojuana.'

Author, poet, storyteller, Jim Northrup, Ojibwe

Author, poet, storyteller, Jim Northrup, Ojibwe

Brazil

Our students have to learn that education does not come in schools. All schools do is teach you some tools. Then you have to use these tools to learn yourself. You learn by reading.

Our students have to learn that education does not come in schools. All schools do is teach you some tools. Then you have to use these tools to learn yourself. You learn by reading.

Ecuador

El Salvador

Emcee One and Supaman in the video for 'Too Far.'

Emcee One and Supaman in the video for 'Too Far.'

Guatemala

Haiti

'We're not bending the truth, or stereotyping anybody,' sats director/star Jones.

'We're not bending the truth, or stereotyping anybody,' sats director/star Jones.

Nicaragua

Nuna, trailed by her Arctic fox friend, in a screenshot from 'Never Alone.'

Nuna, trailed by her Arctic fox friend, in a screenshot from 'Never Alone.'

Peru

Woody Harrelson as the character Harlan de Groat in 'Out of the Furnace.' De Groat is a common last name among the Ramapough Lunaape.

Woody Harrelson as the character Harlan de Groat in 'Out of the Furnace.' De Groat is a common last name among the Ramapough Lunaape.

Spain

emerson-windy-apology-peace-pipe