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Code talker honored by senators

WASHINGTON ñ The last remaining Lakota code talker was honored by South Dakotaís Senate delegation with a star quilt during a national language conference.

Clarence Wolf Guts, Lakota, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, was awarded a star quilt for his contributions during World War II. The award and his presence at the language conference were to draw attention to the importance of the many languages of Indian country.

Wolf Guts received the star quilt from Sens. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., and John Thune, R-S.D., during the National Indian Associationís Native Languages Legislative Summit.

ìThe star quilt presented today is a small form of appreciation for the hard work and dedication shown by Clarence Wolf Guts and his fellow code talkers. By their willingness to serve our country, they empowered the Allies in World War II with strong communication that was secure and secret from our enemies,î Johnson said.

Johnson said he supports a bill in the Senate that will support the teaching of American Indian languages and help support immersion and survival schools.

ìWhen young Native Americans are taught Native language it improves all of their [school] subjects. This legislation is to ensure the language lives on,î Johnson said.

The bill, Senate Bill 2674, is currently in the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. Johnson is a member of that committee.

ìThe code talkers were credited with saving countless lives. These accomplishments stand out even more because alienation to not speak the native tongue was widespread,î Johnson said.

ìI am proud to join in honoring Wolf Guts today; he has expressed his pride and love for America.î

Wolf Guts joined the Marines in his late teens. At the time he was unaware of the code talker training, but he was asked to participate. Code talkers from the Great Sioux Nation included all three dialects, Lakota, Nakota and Dakota.

At least 17 American Indian nations participated in the code talker program.

Johnson also introduced legislation to award gold and silver medals of honor to all American Indian code talkers.

WASHINGTON ñ The last remaining Lakota code talker was honored by South Dakotaís Senate delegation with a star quilt during a national language conference.Clarence Wolf Guts, Lakota, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, was awarded a star quilt for his contributions during World War II. The award and his presence at the language conference were to draw attention to the importance of the many languages of Indian country.Wolf Guts received the star quilt from Sens. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., and John Thune, R-S.D., during the National Indian Associationís Native Languages Legislative Summit.ìThe star quilt presented today is a small form of appreciation for the hard work and dedication shown by Clarence Wolf Guts and his fellow code talkers. By their willingness to serve our country, they empowered the Allies in World War II with strong communication that was secure and secret from our enemies,î Johnson said.Johnson said he supports a bill in the Senate that will support the teaching of American Indian languages and help support immersion and survival schools.ìWhen young Native Americans are taught Native language it improves all of their [school] subjects. This legislation is to ensure the language lives on,î Johnson said.The bill, Senate Bill 2674, is currently in the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. Johnson is a member of that committee.ìThe code talkers were credited with saving countless lives. These accomplishments stand out even more because alienation to not speak the native tongue was widespread,î Johnson said.ìI am proud to join in honoring Wolf Guts today; he has expressed his pride and love for America.îWolf Guts joined the Marines in his late teens. At the time he was unaware of the code talker training, but he was asked to participate. Code talkers from the Great Sioux Nation included all three dialects, Lakota, Nakota and Dakota.At least 17 American Indian nations participated in the code talker program.Johnson also introduced legislation to award gold and silver medals of honor to all American Indian code talkers.