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10 Images From The 25th Comanche Nation Fair

10 Photos: The Comanche Nation Fair, the largest fair in southwest Oklahoma,marks its 25th year in existence.
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In 1992, Wallace Coffee had a vision. He returned to Lawton, OK from Denver, CO, to assume duties as chairman of the Comanche Nation. When he got there he found his fellow citizens discouraged and in low spirits. They needed something. Coffey said, “After praying about it for a period of time, the Comanche fair came to me.”

The Comanche Nation Fair, touted as the largest fair in southwest Oklahoma, is now held at the Comanche Nation complex. It was held the weekend of September 30th through October 2nd and was the silver anniversary for the event, marking its 25th year in existence.

Carolyn Codopony, program director at Comanche Nation and fair volunteer, says the fair is a, “total volunteer effort, no one gets an hourly wage. Employees put on the event for the people. Comanche Nation employees aren’t required to volunteer but they do.” According to the website, tribal employees volunteered to run the fair from the beginning. It’s a tradition they continue, returning year after year.

Last year, 530 camps were registered, and approximately 100,000 people attended. This year was not as large, but the event was still considered a great success. Codopony says “non tribal elder attended the fair and was very impressed with how things were run.”

Smoke Signals star Adam Beach was in attendance and signed autographs for Comanche citizens and others. Codopony said, “Adam Beach was inspiring, positive, happy, and fit in with the Numunus (Comanche). He’s funny and was so personable and approachable. I love him!”

Here is a glimpse of the 25th annual Comanche Nation Fair

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